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Great Barrow War Memorial

A Grade II Listed Building in Barrow, Cheshire West and Chester

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Coordinates

Latitude: 53.2091 / 53°12'32"N

Longitude: -2.7959 / 2°47'45"W

OS Eastings: 346942

OS Northings: 368295

OS Grid: SJ469682

Mapcode National: GBR 7F.1Z82

Mapcode Global: WH889.0LXQ

Entry Name: Great Barrow War Memorial

Listing Date: 2 December 2016

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1439331

Location: Barrow, Cheshire West and Chester, CH3

County: Cheshire West and Chester

Parish: Barrow

Traditional County: Cheshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Cheshire

Church of England Parish: Barrow St Bartholomew

Church of England Diocese: Chester

Summary

First World War memorial, by Haswell and Son of Kaleyards, Chester and unveiled on 17 July 1920, with further names added after the Second World War.

Description

MATERIALS: sandstone memorial and bronze plaques.

DESCRIPTION: the memorial is located within the churchyard of St Bartholomew’s Church, and it comprises a Celtic-style wheel-head cross approximately 4m tall. Interlace detailing in relief to both sides, including a central leaf motif, is positioned upon an angular, tapered shaft. Five further leaf motifs in relief feature in a central column, evenly spaced, down the length of the shaft.

The shaft stands upon a square plinth with angular, pillared shoulders to all four corners, bearing bronze plaques to three sides (N, S and W) with inscriptions in relief. The plinth is positioned upon a two-stepped octagonal base.

The general inscription to the S facing side of the plinth reads: TO THE GREATER GLORY OF GOD / & TO COMMEMORATE THE SELF / SACRIFICE & DEVOTION OF THE / BRAVE SONS OF THIS VILLAGE / WHO DIED FIGHTING FOR ENGLAND / IN THE GREAT WAR 1914 – 1919. The names and individual ranks of 21 men who fell in the First World War are inscribed on the N facing side of the plinth.

‘AND ALSO OF’ followed by the names of three men who served in the 1939 – 1945 war, are inscribed in relief upon a third bronze plaque, added to the W facing side of the plinth.


This List entry has been amended to add the source for War Memorials Online. This source was not used in the compilation of this List entry but is added here as a guide for further reading, 27 February 2017.

History

The aftermath of the First World War saw the biggest single wave of public commemoration ever with tens of thousands of memorials erected across England, both as a result of the huge impact the loss of three quarters of a million British lives had on communities and the official policy of not repatriating the dead, which meant that the memorials provided the main focus of the grief felt at this great loss.

One such memorial was raised at Great Barrow as a permanent testament to the sacrifice made by the members of the local community who lost their lives in the First World War.

The memorial was funded by voluntary contributions, the cost amounting to £190. The work was carried out by Haswell and Son of Kaleyards, Chester. The memorial was unveiled on Sunday 17 July 1920, by Major Harry Barnston MP (who also unveiled Farndon war memorial in November 1919), and dedicated by the rector, Rev T Jenkins. ‘The church was filled to the doors...then followed a most impressive service.’ The cross was unveiled from beneath the drape of a Union Jack and the national anthem along with a number of hymns were sung. The Last Post and Reveille were sounded by buglers from the Cheshire Regiment.

Following the Second World War, the names of three men who fell in that war were added to the west facing side the plinth.

Reasons for Listing

Great Barrow War Memorial is listed at Grade II for the following principal reasons:
* Historic interest: as an eloquent witness to the tragic impact of world events on this community, and the sacrifices it has made in the conflicts of the C20;
* Architectural interest: an elegant wheel-head cross with carved decorative details;
* Group value: with the Church of St Bartholomew (Grade II*), churchyard gates (Grade II) and a medieval cross remains, now a sundial, in the churchyard (Grade II and a scheduled monument).

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