History in Structure

This site is entirely user-supported. See how you can help.

Sclerder Abbey

A Grade II Listed Building in Polperro, Cornwall

We don't have any photos of this building yet. Why don't you be the first to send us one?

Upload Photo »

Approximate Location Map
Large Map »

Coordinates

Latitude: 50.3505 / 50°21'1"N

Longitude: -4.5013 / 4°30'4"W

OS Eastings: 222150

OS Northings: 53055

OS Grid: SX221530

Mapcode National: GBR ND.W7M7

Mapcode Global: FRA 18G3.N72

Entry Name: Sclerder Abbey

Listing Date: 26 March 1986

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1140742

English Heritage Legacy ID: 61558

Location: Polperro, Cornwall, PL13

County: Cornwall

Civil Parish: Polperro

Traditional County: Cornwall

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Cornwall

Church of England Parish: Talland

Church of England Diocese: Truro

Find accommodation in
Polperro

Listing Text

LANSALLOS SCLERDER LANE, (south side),
SW 25 SW
Polperro
4/197 Sclerder Abbey
-
II

Monastery for enclosed order of Carmelites, including walls to north front and east
and cemetery walls to east. Circa 1840s. Extended in the late C19, 1920s and in
1937. Stone rubble with slate roofs with gable ends. 1937 extension with front wall
of red brick.
Main range of overall H-shaped plan with refectory in central range, kitchens in
cross wing on left and sister's chapel in crosswing on right. Further public church
added in circa 1920s at right angles to private chapel with common chancel; gatehouse
added to front of cross wing on right possibly in late C19 or early C20; noviciate in
C18 cottage to front of left-hand cross wing, remodelled in C20, and large range
added to rear of left-hand wing in 1937.
Main range behind high stone wall; regular 4-window front with entrance in left-hand
angle. of central range. and cross wing. C19 fenestration with evidence of several
alterations in C20. Gabled half-dormers above and C20 extension to front on right.
3-storey gatehouse on road side to right with double gabled asymmetrical 2-window
front. Ground floor with two 3-light mullion windows flanking moulded 2-centred arch
with double plank door and ornate hinges. Further 1-light window to right and 2-
light window in C20 extension. First floor with two 4-light mullion windows and
second floor with two 1-light mullion window, all with hoodmoulds.
Interior with C19 pitch pine joinery and with carved stone fireplace in 1937 range
with relief depicting S. Francis of Assisi.
High stone rubble wall to front on north and continuing along east side of monastery.
Stone rubble walls to public cementry on east with series of semi-circular niches.
Originally a Fransican Monastery, followed by Poor Clares, and now an enclosed order
of Carmelites. It was associated with Sir Harry Trelawney who was a convert and
later a Catholic Bishop in Rome, and with his 2 daughters Letitia Trelawney and Mary
Harding.
During the 1840s the Franciscan monks living at Sclerder celebrated mass in the
chapel at Trelawne (qv) which was opened for public worship to Roman Catholics by Sir
Harry Trelawney. The chapel reverted to Anglican use when Sir Harry died. Letitia
Trelawney, Mary Harding and Lewis Harding (responsible for many early photographs of
Polperro and also Trelawne) are buried at Sclerder Abbey.
Lanyon, A The Rooks of Trelawne 1976
Grylls, R. Glynn Trelawne.


Listing NGR: SX2215053055

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Selected Sources

Source links go to a search for the specified title at Amazon. Availability of the title is dependent on current publication status. You may also want to check AbeBooks, particularly for older titles.

Other nearby listed buildings

BritishListedBuildings.co.uk is an independent online resource and is not associated with any government department. All government data published here is used under licence. Please do not contact BritishListedBuildings.co.uk for any queries related to any individual listed building, planning permission related to listed buildings or the listing process itself.

British Listed Buildings is a Good Stuff website.