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Church of All Saints

A Grade I Listed Building in King's Bromley, Staffordshire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 52.7507 / 52°45'2"N

Longitude: -1.8206 / 1°49'14"W

OS Eastings: 412208

OS Northings: 317025

OS Grid: SK122170

Mapcode National: GBR 4CW.GK9

Mapcode Global: WHCGH.04B2

Plus Code: 9C4WQ52H+7Q

Entry Name: Church of All Saints

Listing Date: 27 February 1964

Grade: I

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1277769

English Heritage Legacy ID: 430371

Location: King's Bromley, Lichfield, Staffordshire, DE13

County: Staffordshire

Civil Parish: King's Bromley

Built-Up Area: King's Bromley

Traditional County: Staffordshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Staffordshire

Church of England Parish: Kings Bromley All Saints

Church of England Diocese: Lichfield

Tagged with: Church building

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Description

SK 11 NW; 7/53

KING'S BROMLEY C.P.,
CHURCH LANE (north side)

Church of All Saints

27.02.64

GV

I

Parish church. Late C11 nave, early C14 chancel and north aisle, C16 west
tower, C19 north vestry and organ chamber. Coursed rubble nave with ashlar
dressings, otherwise sandstone ashlar; plain tile and lead-covered roofs
with stone coped verges. West tower, three-bay nave with north aisle and south
porch, two-bay chancel, and north vestry and organ chamber.

West tower:
Three stages marked by strings; diagonal buttresses and crenellated parapet with
crocketed corner pinnacles. Four-centred west door with moulded surround,
panelled spandrels and hoodmould. Directly above is a 4-centred 3-light
window with Perpendicular tracery and returned hoodmould. Rectangular
loops with chamfered surrounds to third stage. Pointed 3-light belfry windows
with Perpendicular tracery. Nave: South wall retains an C11 loop with
rounded head to the south and pilaster buttresses to the east. Two early
C14 south windows; both of two lights, one with cusped Y-tracery which may
replace a doorway (see straight joints below the jambs), and the other with
a single reticulation in the head. Four C15 clerestory windows to the
south, each of three cinquefoil-headed lights with sunken spandrels. Mid-C19
Tudor Gothic porch with crenellated parapet and corner pinnacles; four-centred
entrance flanked by trefoil-headed panels. North aisle: High pitched
roof. Pointed windows with Y-tracery. Pointed north door with wave-moulded
surround and ogee hood, flanked by small buttresses. Chancel: Pointed
side windows with Y-tracery, pointed east window with C19 Perpendicular tracery.

INTERIOR. Early C14 arcade with pointed arches of two chamfered orders and
octagonal columns with moulded capitals. C16 tall and pointed tower arch
and C14 wide and pointed chancel arch, both of two chamfered orders. Nearly
flat nave roof with moulded tie beams, ridge piece and rafters, probably
C15, restored 1927, Common-rafter roof with arch-braced collars over the
north aisle, possibly C14, but if so it has been interfered with for it now
blocks the clerestory windows. A pointed arch between the north aisle,
and vestry and organ chamber partly blocks the east window of the north aisle.
This comprised 3-lancet lights beneath a larger pointed arch. Remains of
a staircase between north aisle and chancel which led to the rood loft.
In the chancel a piscina and a small recess, both early C14, both with trefoiled
heads. C19 arch-braced collar roof over chancel. FITTINGS: Octagonal
stone font inscribed "WH / SM / 1664"; moulded basin and frieze of shields.
Oak pulpit inscribed "EC / RM / 1656" but much restored in the C19, octagonal
with door and top panels carved with grapes and vine leaves. Brass eagle
Lectern of 1903. Screen probably early C16 with tracery of intertwined
brances bearing leaves and human heads. C19 Perpendicular-style marble
reredos. Stained glass: Chancel north window of 1887 by Morris & Co.,
depicting St James & St. Paul. C18 glass in the vestry by Francis Eginton.
MONUMENTS: Samuel Newton, died 1751 and John Newton, died 1783; a pair
of near identical pedimented tablets with urns. Elizabeth Newton, died
1794, sarcophagus. B.o.E. p. 163.


Listing NGR: SK1220617025

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