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Salvation Army Citadel (Former Primitive Methodist Chapel)

A Grade II Listed Building in Barton-upon-Humber, North Lincolnshire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 53.6852 / 53°41'6"N

Longitude: -0.4394 / 0°26'21"W

OS Eastings: 503165

OS Northings: 422100

OS Grid: TA031221

Mapcode National: GBR TTCT.PP

Mapcode Global: WHGFX.7M1Q

Entry Name: Salvation Army Citadel (Former Primitive Methodist Chapel)

Listing Date: 12 February 2008

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1392472

English Heritage Legacy ID: 504238

Location: Barton-upon-Humber, North Lincolnshire, DN18

County: North Lincolnshire

Civil Parish: Barton-upon-Humber

Built-Up Area: Barton-upon-Humber

Traditional County: Lincolnshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Lincolnshire

Church of England Parish: Barton on Humber St Mary

Church of England Diocese: Lincoln

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Barton upon Humber

Listing Text

BARTON UPON HUMBER

711/0/10013 QUEEN STREET
12-FEB-08 SALVATION ARMY CITADEL (FORMER PRIMITI
VE METHODIST CHAPEL)

GV II
Former Primitive Methodist chapel,1867, by Joseph Wright of Hull. Polychrome brickwork, stone dressings, re-laid Welsh slate roof.

PLAN
Two storey Protestant auditory plan form chapel (ie rectangular with a horseshoe gallery) with its gable end facing Queen Street, with the stairs to the upper gallery within set-back bays that flank the main frontage. There is also a single storey rear projection original designed as a Sunday School.

EXTERIOR
The symmetrical, 2 storey, 4 bay principal elevation fronts onto Queen Street and is mainly built of fair faced red brickwork with detailing employing both buff bricks and blue engineering bricks, as well as some stone dressings. The stone steps to the front of the building are a later alteration. The central 2 bays are broad. Each has a round arched entrance featuring nail head decoration supported by a pair of stone colonnettes with foliate capitals as well as bosses half way down their shafts. The entrances are broken slightly forward and covered with hood mould in the form of gables with foliate finials with a decorative roundel below. Above each entrance at first floor level there are paired round headed windows still retaining their original sash windows with marginal glazing bars. There is a nail head band below the cills of these windows and also at the level of their arch springs. The gable above is pedimented, the coping supported by distinctive corbelling, and topped by a decorative wrought iron finial. The narrower side bays are slightly set back and feature a pair of stepped, round topped slit windows (lighting internal staircases) at ground floor level with a single window at the first floor in the same style as the paired windows to the central bays. The decorative band courses from the central bays also continue across the side bays; however they are topped by hipped roofs rather than being pedimented. The hipped roofs are also topped by wrought iron finials. The whole elevation is further enlivened with the decorative use of buff bricks and blue engineering bricks.

The side elevations are much plainer; although still feature some decoration in buff brickwork. The general brick work also employs stock bricks of more variable colour than the fair faced red bricks used for the front elevation. Windows to the chapel are paired: round arched to the first floor, segmentally arched to the ground floor, all featuring sash windows with marginal glazing bars. The roof to the chapel has a crested ridge and a central louvered ventilator. The single storey rear projection forming the Sunday School is of 4 bays, but shorter than the 4 bays of the side of the chapel. The bay closest to the chapel on the north side has a segmentally arched entrance that has had its joinery replaced to include a standard sized single door. The other three bays retain 6x6 light sash windows beneath flat arches.

INTERIOR
The interior of the chapel has been altered by being floored over at gallery level. Although the balcony front has been lost, the original curving gallery pews remain in situ. The ceiling is coffered, with each recessed panel having a central decorative ceiling boss featuring a range of foliated designs. The foliated plasterwork of the arch to the organ/choir recess also survives. The original marginal glazing to the windows is etched, also featuring a foliated design. The ground floor pews have been lost, but the collumns supporting the gallery remain, as do the original staircases up to the gallery. The Sunday School to the rear survives intact, complete with the original boarded dado, exposed roof trusses and a room-dividing screen.

HISTORY
The foundation stone for the former Queen Street Primitive Methodist chapel was laid in April 1867 and the chapel was opened later the same year to replace an earlier chapel of 1838 in Newport. This in turn had been a replacement for a chapel in King Street. Barton upon Humber fell within the Hull District which was one of the leading areas for Primitive Methodism in the country. Non-conformism was strong in Barton with four times the number attending the two non-conformist chapels in 1851 than the number attending the Anglican church. The architect was Joseph Wright of Hull who designed over 20 chapels for the Primitive Methodists in the region and who had been a pupil of Cuthbert Brodrick. It cost £1500 to build and originally had seating for 600 people until closure as a Methodist chapel in 1961. It re-opened as a Salvation Army Citadel in 1965.

SOURCES
John French, "A Victorian Legacy" in Tyszka, D., Miller, K., and Bryant, G. (eds), 1991 Land, People and Landscapes: Essays. on the History of the Lincolnshire Region
D & S Neave, 1990 "East Riding Chapels and Meeting Houses"
D Neave, 1991 "Lost Churches and Chapels of Hull"


REASON FOR DESIGNATION DECISION
Queen Street Salvation Army Citadel (the former Primitive Methodist chapel) is designated at grade II for the following principal reasons:
* For the quality of the High Victorian architectural design of the chapel, particularly the main frontage facing Queen Street
* As a good example of a mid C19 Methodist chapel retaining evidence of its original internal arrangement including the pews of the former gallery and the single storey rear part of the building originally designed as a Sunday School.
* For its positive contribution to a remarkable group of mid C19 public buildings, all of which are already listed, with the immediately adjacent Queen Street National School listed in grade II*
* As a well preserved and impressive example of the work of Joseph Wright, a notable architect of Methodist chapels in the region and a pupil of the nationally notable Cuthbert Brodrick

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Reasons for Listing

* For the quality of the High Victorian architectural design of the chapel, particularly the main frontage facing Queen Street
* As a good example of a mid C19 Methodist chapel retaining evidence of its original internal arrangement including the pews of the former gallery and the single storey rear part of the building originally designed as a Sunday School.
* For its positive contribution to a remarkable group of mid C19 public buildings, all of which are already listed, with the immediately adjacent Queen Street National School listed in grade II*
* As a well preserved and impressive example of the work of Joseph Wright, a notable architect of Methodist chapels in the region and a pupil of the nationally notable Cuthbert Brodrick

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