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Barrow Hill Primary School

A Grade II Listed Building in Barrow Hill, Derbyshire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 53.274 / 53°16'26"N

Longitude: -1.3737 / 1°22'25"W

OS Eastings: 441865

OS Northings: 375409

OS Grid: SK418754

Mapcode National: GBR LZVL.D2

Mapcode Global: WHDF3.WY1Y

Plus Code: 9C5W7JFG+JG

Entry Name: Barrow Hill Primary School

Listing Date: 15 October 2009

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1393487

English Heritage Legacy ID: 504046

Location: Staveley, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, S43

County: Derbyshire

District: Chesterfield

Town: Chesterfield

Civil Parish: Staveley

Built-Up Area: Barrow Hill

Traditional County: Derbyshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Derbyshire

Church of England Parish: Staveley St John the Baptist

Church of England Diocese: Derby

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Description

STAVELEY

827/0/10005 STATION ROAD
15-OCT-09 Barrow Hill Primary School

II
Primary School, formerly the Barrow Hill (Mixed) School. 1853-6, with C20 alterations and additions. Built for Richard Barrow, Chairman of the Staveley Coal and Iron Company Ltd.

MATERIALS: Coursed squared sandstone with ashlar dressings, coped gables and a Welsh slate roof covering.

PLAN: Asymmetrical L-shaped plan with advanced entrance tower and spire to south-east frontage.

EXTERIOR: The south-east elevation is composed of 4 elements, with the tall 5 bay hall and the advanced attached tower and spire at its south-west corner forming the central component. The hall has 4 tall 6-light mullion and transom windows with a stepped string course forming hoodmoulds above the openings. Between two central windows is a tall stepped buttress. Below each window is an inserted doorway with a C20 glazed door. The tower is of 2 stages and has stepped buttresses and arch-headed traceried 2 light mullioned windows to the upper stage, below a crenellated parapet with crocketed pinnacles to the corners. The tower supports an octagonal spire with 2 tiers of lucarnes. To the north-east of the hall is the advanced gable of a 6-bay classroom range with central paired mullion and transom windows separated by a major mullion. To the side of the gable is a single storey gabled entrance porch with an arched doorway above which is an inscribed panel which reads 'Infants'. Attached to the south-west wall of the tower is the gable of a long classroom range with a gabled entrance porch to its south-west side, the detailing and configuration of these elements matching those on the north-east side of the hall. Set back behind the west porch is a 3 bay wing to the west classroom range with 2, 4-light mullion and transom windows to its south side wall. The classroom range behind the North-East elevation has the porch at its south-east end, then an advanced gable with a stepped mullion and transom window with a 6-light central part and flanking 2-light sections. To the right are the 4 tall mullion and transom windows and the central stepped buttress of the north-east classroom range. All of the window openings have an inserted doorway below them with C20 glazed doors. The south-west elevation has the gable to the classroom wing at the south-east end with a stepped mullion and transom window at its centre. Set back behind this is a 10 bay classroom range, with 6-light windows arranged 2:3:3:2, with the window groups separated by 3 stepped buttresses. The mullions and transoms to the 5 windows at the northern end of the range have been removed and replacement glazing fitted.

INTERIOR: The central hall retains panelled partitions to the end walls where they abut the classroom ranges. A false ceiling has been fitted which conceals the hall roof trusses. A doorway leads from the hall to the tower stair which has plain metal balusters and handrail. The other parts of the building's interior retain no notable original fixtures or fittings.

HISTORY : The school was built between 1853 and 1856 as part of the development of a new industrial community by the Staveley Coal and Iron Company Ltd, and named after the then chairman of the company, Richard Barrow. Barrow had succeeded his brother George as company chairman, and oversaw the expansion of the business and the growth of the workforce. He planned a model settlement to house the enlarged community of workers, managers and their families, much as Richard Arkwright and the Strutts had done at Cromford and Belper in the late C18, and as would happen in the late C19 in Derbyshire coalfield communities such as New Bolsover, Shirebrook and Arkwright Town. The school was built to serve additionally as a church and meeting room until the settlement's church building was completed. The housing development included 178 workers' houses and 8 large villas for managers which were sited immediately to the north-west and west of the school site. In 1905, ownership of the school was transferred to Derbyshire County Council. In the conveyancing document, the school is referred to as 'The Barrow Hill (Mixed) School or The Staveley Works Church School'.
REASONS FOR DESIGNATION
Barrow Hill Primary School is designated at Grade II for the following principal reasons:

* It is a distinguished and well-preserved example of mid C19 school architecture in the Gothic style advocated by the Ecclesiologists and given expression in Parish schools of the period.

* It is a notable example of educational provision as part of a planned model industrial settlement in which the school was seen as both a visual and a social focal point, fulfilling the functions of school, church and community meeting room.

* In form, scale and architectural quality, the school anticipates some of the improvements in school architecture and planning which resulted from the Elementary Education Act of 1871, and the establishment of the School Boards.

Reasons for Listing

Barrow Hill Primary School is designated at Grade II for the following principal reasons:
* It is a distinguished and well-preserved example of mid-C19 school architecture in the Gothic style advocated by the Ecclesiologists and given expression in Parish schools of the period.
* It is part of a planned model industrial settlement in which the school was seen as both a visual and a social focal point, fulfilling the functions of school, church and community meeting room.
* In form, scale and architectural quality, the school anticipates some of the improvements in school architecture which resulted from the Elementary Education Act of 1871, and the establishment of the School Boards.

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