History in Structure

This site is entirely user-supported. See how you can help.

24-28 (Even Nos) the Cross

A Category B Listed Building in Beith, North Ayrshire

We don't have any photos of this building yet. Why don't you be the first to send us one?

Upload Photo »

Approximate Location Map
Large Map »

Coordinates

Latitude: 55.7506 / 55°45'2"N

Longitude: -4.6331 / 4°37'59"W

OS Eastings: 234838

OS Northings: 653944

OS Grid: NS348539

Mapcode National: GBR 39.BPV2

Mapcode Global: WH2NB.SQYC

Entry Name: 24-28 (Even Nos) the Cross

Listing Date: 2 December 1980

Category: B

Source: Historic Scotland

Source ID: 331329

Historic Scotland Designation Reference: LB884

Building Class: Cultural

Location: Beith

County: North Ayrshire

Electoral Ward: Kilbirnie and Beith

Traditional County: Ayrshire

Find accommodation in
Beith

Description

Later 18th century, with early 19th century alterations; restored 2003. 3-bay 2-storey and attic nepus gabled building. Central recessed door with early 19th century Tuscan columned doorpiece, entablature over; flanking doors; large shopfronts (enlarged windows) to outer L and R. 3 windows to 1st floor; 2 small windows, angle pilasters, scrolled skewputs and apex stack to nepus gable; late 19th century piended, bipartite dormer to R. Harled with sandstone margins; eaves course and moulded eaves cornice.

W (REAR) ELEVATION: 2 storeys, 3 bays. Central gabled stair tower. Irregular fenestration.

Traditional timber sash and case replacement 12-pane windows (painted dark green); 4-pane to nepus, 2-pane to dormer. Grey slates; stone ridge; circular clay cans. Cast-iron rainwater goods.

INTERIOR: refurbished 2003, nothing original survives.

Statement of Interest

This is the centrepiece and the oldest of the group of five buildings at The Cross which benefited from the Townscape Heritage Initiative in 2003. These buildings were restored using traditional materials and techniques and the end result contributes much to the town centre of Beith. The form of this building and its low wallhead suggest a fairly early date for this building type in the town. The classical doorpiece, flanking doors and large shopfront openings are later, as is the dormer. These elements are part of the building's evolution and are in keeping with the traditional materials and form of the original. The difference in architectural styles between the five buildings provides interest and variation in the townscape. This factor together with the group's prominent position adjacent to the Auld Kirk and burial ground (separately listed) makes a strong focal point in the town.

Recommended Books

Other nearby listed buildings

BritishListedBuildings.co.uk is an independent online resource and is not associated with any government department. All government data published here is used under licence. Please do not contact BritishListedBuildings.co.uk for any queries related to any individual listed building, planning permission related to listed buildings or the listing process itself.

British Listed Buildings is a Good Stuff website.