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2, 4 Bank Street, Thomson's House

A Category A Listed Building in Inverkeithing, Fife

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Coordinates

Latitude: 56.031 / 56°1'51"N

Longitude: -3.397 / 3°23'49"W

OS Eastings: 313042

OS Northings: 682890

OS Grid: NT130828

Mapcode National: GBR 20.S4S9

Mapcode Global: WH6S3.SNLY

Entry Name: 2, 4 Bank Street, Thomson's House

Listing Date: 11 December 1972

Category: A

Source: Historic Scotland

Source ID: 379539

Historic Scotland Designation Reference: LB35090

Building Class: Cultural

Location: Inverkeithing

County: Fife

Town: Inverkeithing

Electoral Ward: Inverkeithing and Dalgety Bay

Traditional County: Fife

Find accommodation in
Inverkeithing

Description

Dated 1617. 2-storey (3-storeys to rear), 4-bay traditional town house with 3-stage corbelled cap-house stair tower to SW corner, carved over-door pediment and window lintel panel. Circa 1966, single storey (2-storeys to rear), 3-bay extension to S. Harled; moulded stone margins; moulded eaves course to E and W.

W (PRINCIPAL) ELEVATION: timber boarded door at foot of stair tower to right, set within moulded architrave, carved pediment above inscribed and dated 'IT BT / EXCEPT THE / LORD BVLD [sic] THE HOVS THEY / LABOVR IN VAINE THAT BVILD/ IT. PSALM –- –17'; 3 unevenly spaced ground floor windows to right of door; arrow slit to right return. Window to second stage of stair tower, transomed and mullioned window to right return; 2 evenly spaced 1st floor windows to left. Plain stair tower gable head rising above roof line, window to left return, 2 windows to right return. Circa 1966 extension: recessed 2-storey link, garage door to ground floor, window above. Window and door to right return; 2 windows to single storey section at line of street.

S ELEVATION: adjoining No 8 Bank Street.

E (REAR) ELEVATION: 3-storey; 4-bay. Arched doorway to left; small ground floor window to right set under turnpike stair leading to door at 1st floor; 2 ground floor windows to right of stair. 3 pink polished granite columns (without capitals) to back garden.

N ELEVATION: adjoining Nos 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19 Townhall Street.

Predominantly 12-pane timber sash and case windows; leaded panes to transomed and mullioned window to stair tower. Pitched roof; pantiles to main house; concrete tiles to circa 1966 extension.

INTERIOR: stone turnpike stair to tower; stone architraves, pointed arches at foot of stair tower and to W kitchen extension (former main doorway revealing thick former outer wall); most original moulded stone fireplaces restored; early 18th century panelling to former reception rooms to rear including hearth dated '1617'; exposed timber beams.

Statement of Interest

This house, restored in 1964-1966 by former owner Peter J Findlay, is the best-preserved example of 17th century domestic burgh architecture in Inverkeithing and is a pre-eminent example of its type, similar to some of the best buildings in Culross (in particular The Study - see separate listing). Thomson's House consisted originally of a 2-storeyed oblong main block with a stair-wing at the south-west end, these parts forming the back and one end of a lean-to, to which a 3rd storey has been added (RCAHMS). The unusual lean-to roof is locally known as a 'toofall' and is also seen at Rosebery House (see separate listing).The 2-storey front section of the house to the left of the main door was also a later addition (date unknown). A merchant's mark and the initials IT and BT represent John Thomson, burgess, and his wife Bessie Thomsoun. Partially obscured, the inscription refers to Psalm 127. The extension to the S (circa 1966) replaced a gap site which was formerly the site of the Old Music Hall (erected circa 1859 and burnt 1957). The granite columns to the back garden are said to have come from one of the large insurance companies (now demolished) on Princes Street, Edinburgh.

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