History in Structure

This site is entirely user-supported. See how you can help.

Finchy Shiel Including Ice House

A Category C Listed Building in Hutton, Scottish Borders

We don't have any photos of this building yet. Why don't you be the first to send us one?

Upload Photo »

Approximate Location Map
Large Map »

Coordinates

Latitude: 55.7635 / 55°45'48"N

Longitude: -2.092 / 2°5'31"W

OS Eastings: 394327

OS Northings: 652240

OS Grid: NT943522

Mapcode National: GBR F1TS.WS

Mapcode Global: WH9YH.VD0H

Entry Name: Finchy Shiel Including Ice House

Listing Date: 15 March 2001

Category: C

Source: Historic Scotland

Source ID: 395022

Historic Scotland Designation Reference: LB47684

Building Class: Cultural

Location: Hutton

County: Scottish Borders

Electoral Ward: East Berwickshire

Parish: Hutton

Traditional County: Berwickshire

Find accommodation in
Paxton

Description

Probably mid-19th century with later additions and alterations. Single storey with attic, 2-bay, rectangular-plan fishing shiel with single storey additions at rear. Harled sandstone rubble (exposed in part with wallhead heightenend in brick and harled). Fish house to E.

S (ENTRANCE) ELEVATION: later steel door to left; steel shuttered window to right.

E (SIDE) ELEVATION: steel shuttered window at ground to left; steel shuttered window above. Garage door in single storey, lean-to addition to outer right.

N (REAR) ELEVATION: single storey additions projecting at ground.

W (SIDE) ELEVATION: gabled with pointed projection centred at ground. Single storey, mono-pitched addition projecting to outer left.

Velux rooflights to S. Circa 1950, steeply-pitched purple slate roof. Harled apex stack to E; circular can.

INTERIOR: fairly plain storage area.

FISH HOUSE: sandstone rubble. S (ENTRANCE) ELEVATION: square-headed door centred in segmental-arched entrance front.

Statement of Interest

Situated on the River Tweed (renowned for its salmon), to the NE of Paxton House. A good, essentially intact example of a relatively rare building type, particularly notable for its fish house and the bulge in its gable end - a feature common to fishing shiels in the area including that actually on St Thomas's Island and that near Fishwick Mains to the SW (see separate list entry). The Bulge in the gable of this building is solid and was constructed to protect the building from the force of floodwater and floating debris when the River Tweed is in spate. Other buildings of this type in the area have similar bulging gables and although many are for protecting the gables from the river, some were hollows and would have accommodated a net boiler. These are usually noticeable by the flue which projects near the gabblehead. Adjacent to this shiel is a fish house. It is similar in principle to an ice house, but would have been used to keep freshly caught salmon fresh. The shiel was originally lower; the wall heads were raised in the 1950's by adding bricks which were then harled. The attic was then used for storage. The additional lean to at the rear is used to store the boats of the Berwick Amateur Rowing Club, who use the Tweed for practice and racing.

These shiels are a feature of the lower River Tweed. This one formed part of a larger "fishing station" which also included a boat house and a stone flagged tow path punctuated by timber watch houses. Salmon fishing was a major industry in the 19th century. The commercial fishing was done from boats with nets but rod fishing became popular with sportsmen who formed angling clubs which built their own shiels. Although altered, Finchy Shiel remains an important reminder of a now declining industry.

________________________________________________________

See Fishwick Mains, Fishing Shiel and Icehouse near St Thomas's FISHING SHIEL

Island NEAR ST THOMAS'S

ISLAND

________________________________________________________

Recommended Books

Other nearby listed buildings

BritishListedBuildings.co.uk is an independent online resource and is not associated with any government department. All government data published here is used under licence. Please do not contact BritishListedBuildings.co.uk for any queries related to any individual listed building, planning permission related to listed buildings or the listing process itself.

British Listed Buildings is a Good Stuff website.