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1 Roseburn Terrace and Roseburn Street, Roseburn Bar, the Flyhalf

A Category C Listed Building in Edinburgh, Edinburgh

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Coordinates

Latitude: 55.9454 / 55°56'43"N

Longitude: -3.234 / 3°14'2"W

OS Eastings: 323027

OS Northings: 673167

OS Grid: NT230731

Mapcode National: GBR 8DJ.F7

Mapcode Global: WH6SL.9T7L

Entry Name: 1 Roseburn Terrace and Roseburn Street, Roseburn Bar, the Flyhalf

Listing Date: 18 September 2002

Category: C

Source: Historic Scotland

Source ID: 396432

Historic Scotland Designation Reference: LB48914

Building Class: Cultural

Location: Edinburgh

County: Edinburgh

Town: Edinburgh

Electoral Ward: Corstorphine/Murrayfield

Traditional County: Midlothian

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Description

Later 19th century. Bar at ground floor of tenement on corner of Roseburn Terrace and Roseburn Street. 3-bay to either street, with additional lounge bar to Roseburn Street. Coursed, polished sandstone ashlar with polished ashlar dressings; timber-framed plate glass windows with panelled timber aprons.

NE (ENTRANCE) ELEVATION: single chamfered entrance bay on corner of street with depressed arch opening (flanked by pilastered surround), panelled timber entrance door and fanlight above; consoled, bracketed, built-out cornice with curved, carved, decorative pediment above.

N (ROSEBURN TERRACE) ELEVATION: 3-bay. Stone strips between bays; bipartite windows, comprising large plate glass windows above panelled aprons with louvred vents, to 2 bays at left; deep-set door to right of bay at right, part-glazed, with complex geometrical astragal pattern; carved, painted triangular pediment above; turned classical details to opening; square window to left with panelled aprons beneath; turned supports to arched framing devices to 3 openings above; fascia bearing 'RETAIL, WINE MERCHANT, WHOLESALE' surmounts all 3 bays.

SE (ROSEBURN STREET) ELEVATION: 3-bay. Pair of bipartite windows above panelled aprons with louvred vents, to either side of wide, blank stone central bay; WHOLESALE and RETAIL above each windowed bay respectively. Lounge bar to recessed adjoining tenement further down Roseburn St.

INTERIOR: original timber bar, boarded with panelled screen divides and turned finials, acting as base for fluted Corinthian columns linking to ceiling; boarded panelling behind bar with double tier of drinks shelves with turned supports; elaborate cornices form geometric grid on ceiling, joining walls with columns; additional fluted supports; original advertising mirrors.

Statement of Interest

Well-preserved pub interior, including original bar features and decorative columns and plasterwork. The bar has a gradual curve and is separated into different sections easing access to the bar and quick service. The three doors probably also helped to avoid congestion in the bar area. As was increasingly common during the late 19th century, the Fly-half has 2 bars, the main and larger bar and a smaller one, commonly referred to as the "back" bar or "saloon". This was merely a distinction of space (noisy and quieter areas) rather than the social distinction often found in contemporary English pubs. The end of the 19th century was the golden age of pub design and various professions were involved in the process including firms specialising in bar cabinetwork, bar fitters, glass-stainers, decorative painters and architects. The most prominent Edinburgh architects who specialised in pub design were Peter Lyle Henderson, John Forrester and Robert MacFarlane Cameron.

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