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17 Southfield Farm Grove, Southfield Farm

A Category B Listed Building in Edinburgh, Edinburgh

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Coordinates

Latitude: 55.945 / 55°56'41"N

Longitude: -3.1326 / 3°7'57"W

OS Eastings: 329362

OS Northings: 673016

OS Grid: NT293730

Mapcode National: GBR 2B.YJ5X

Mapcode Global: WH6SM.VTHW

Entry Name: 17 Southfield Farm Grove, Southfield Farm

Listing Date: 20 January 2004

Category: B

Source: Historic Scotland

Source ID: 397208

Historic Scotland Designation Reference: LB49626

Building Class: Cultural

Location: Edinburgh

County: Edinburgh

Electoral Ward: Portobello/Craigmillar

Traditional County: Midlothian

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Description

Circa 1827. Plain classical piend-roofed 2-storey 3-bay house. Coursed cream sandstone with ashlar dressings. Later wing to W with adjoining modern conservatory.

N (PRINCIPAL) ELEVATION: cill course to 1st floor; eaves cornice. Ground floor openings in recessed bays. Advanced bay to centre; timber panelled door with border-glazed fanlight.

INTERIOR: some original plasterwork and chimneypieces. Original stair with decorative cast iron balusters and veneered handrail.

Predominantly 6-pane upper, later plate glass lower sashes in timber sash and case windows. Graded grey slates. Corniced end stacks

Statement of Interest

The lands of the Duddingston estate were enclosed by the Earl of Abercorn in the mid 18th century, and formed into 3 large tenanted farms, Northfield, Meadowfield and Southfield. The original Southfield Farm is shown on Kirkwood's map of Edinburgh, just south of the east gate of the Duddingston House policies.

In 1827, at a time when the original leases were expiring, this site was deemed inconvenient, and a new house and steading were built. The steading was demolished in the 1970's and the land (to the south of the house) has been built over, but the garden ground to the N with trees including walnuts remains, as does the walled garden to the W. The fine stone farmhouse is a reminder of the agricultural improvements carried out by the Abercorns in the 18th and 19th centuries.

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