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Balfron, Printers Row, Endrick Cottage

A Category B Listed Building in Balfron, Stirling

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Coordinates

Latitude: 56.0649 / 56°3'53"N

Longitude: -4.3403 / 4°20'25"W

OS Eastings: 254394

OS Northings: 688259

OS Grid: NS543882

Mapcode National: GBR 0W.PWD8

Mapcode Global: WH3N2.9TFD

Entry Name: Balfron, Printers Row, Endrick Cottage

Listing Date: 9 March 2004

Category: B

Source: Historic Scotland

Source ID: 397253

Historic Scotland Designation Reference: LB49667

Building Class: Cultural

Location: Balfron

County: Stirling

Electoral Ward: Forth and Endrick

Traditional County: Stirlingshire

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Balfron

Description

Late 18th century cottage, the birthplace of architect Alexander Thomson (1817-1875). Single storey with attic and flanking single storey piended outshot (now garage) and porch. 3-bay arrangement with central door and porch to roadside with flanking windows and central skylight. 3 windows to garden elevation with dominating modern flat-roofed attic extension above. Attic window in gable walls and gable stacks. Modern timber sash and case windows (plastic to attic extension). Rendered and white painted walls, slate roofs. Wide gables and steep pitch suggest an earlier thatched roof.

Statement of Interest

It should be noted that Endrick Cottage is listed at category B in recognition of its historical and cultural significance as the birthplace of Alexander Thomson, who has been heralded as Glasgow's greatest mid 19th century architect. Although altered, notably by the large attic extension and changes to the fenestration, the building's footprint has not changed from the 1st edition map and the original cottage is still decipherable.

Thomson was born on 9th of April 1817 to Elizabeth Cooper, and John Thomson who worked as a bookmaker in Kirkman & Findlay's cotton spinning mill in Balfron. He was one of nine children born to Elizabeth and John, who lived and were also educated at Endrick Cottage until John's death in 1824, when the family moved to the outskirts of Glasgow [McFadzean]. It is interesting to consider his earliest home with that of the extraordinary and monumental architecture he created, for which he has become renowned.

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