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Bouprie Banks Farm Steading

A Category B Listed Building in Inverkeithing and Dalgety Bay, Fife

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Coordinates

Latitude: 56.0587 / 56°3'31"N

Longitude: -3.3234 / 3°19'24"W

OS Eastings: 317684

OS Northings: 685885

OS Grid: NT176858

Mapcode National: GBR 23.Q9BC

Mapcode Global: WH6RY.XZL6

Entry Name: Bouprie Banks Farm Steading

Listing Date: 24 March 2004

Category: B

Source: Historic Scotland

Source ID: 397277

Historic Scotland Designation Reference: LB49685

Building Class: Cultural

Location: Aberdour (Fife)

County: Fife

Electoral Ward: Inverkeithing and Dalgety Bay

Traditional County: Fife

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Aberdour

Description

Earlier 19th century with later additions. U-plan farm steading with pair of small projecting single bay, single storey wings. Cartshed, granary, stable and threshing barn to SW range. Dairy, egg house and byre to NE range, covered cattle court to central courtyard, horsemill to rear NW. Random rubble with droved ashlar quoins to openings and arrises.

SW RANGE: right; 3 segmental headed arched openings to cart shed with 2 small louvered openings to granary equally spaced above. Left; stable door at ground with hayloft door breaking eaves set close above, equally spaced flanking small windows at ground, unequally spaced flanking small louvered openings at 1st floor. 2 large, wide openings to threshing barn to far left, sliding timber door at left. INTERIOR: brick setts to threshing barn.

NE RANGE: door to centre and left, blocked window in gable end bay.

SE ELEVATION: pair of single storey, single bay wings at S gable ends. NE; former dairy, door to centre. SW; large door to store. Central cattle court setback in yard; 3 piended roofs; small door to centre, flanking large full height doors to outer bays, narrow modern timber shed adjoining cattle court to NE range. INTERIOR: cast-iron columns to either side of central bay supporting open truss A-frame roof to interior.

NW RANGE: horse mill to right, circular with 6 openings. Modern brick and corrugated plastic barn to left. INTERIOR: remnants of machinery to horsemill exposed to rafters

Boarded timber doors, timber sash and case windows, timber ventilator louvers to openings. Piended red clay pantiles roofs to single storey wings, cattle court and threshing barn. Polygonal shaped roof with red clay pantiles to horsemill. Pitched red clay pantiles to SW range. Pitched corrugated asbestos roof to NE range.

Statement of Interest

NOTES: Aberdour and surrounding lands is divided between the old feudal estates of the Earls of Morton and the Earls of Moray. Bouprie Banks was part of the Moray estate and is arguably the best surviving simple and compact steading of its type within the Aberdour Parish. Its mix of different buildings highlight the wide range of jobs that were carried out on a small arable/grazing farm, the remaining horse mill is of particular interest. The 1st edition Ordnance Survey map shows the cattle court to be open, however by the time of the 2nd edition it had been covered reflecting the developments in farming at the time. The majority of the steading is still roofed in traditional pantiles, many steadings have been re-roofed in modern materials. The tenant farmer lived in the small farmhouse to the S of the steading, the farmhouse unlike the steading has been modernised and extended extensively in the 20th century. When the estate was broken up and sold in the 1960s the farm became privately owned and managed.

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