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1-9 (Inclusive Numbers) Ravelston Terrace

A Category C Listed Building in Edinburgh, Edinburgh

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Coordinates

Latitude: 55.9531 / 55°57'11"N

Longitude: -3.2253 / 3°13'31"W

OS Eastings: 323587

OS Northings: 674024

OS Grid: NT235740

Mapcode National: GBR 8GF.5G

Mapcode Global: WH6SL.FMDL

Entry Name: 1-9 (Inclusive Numbers) Ravelston Terrace

Listing Date: 11 November 2009

Category: C

Source: Historic Scotland

Source ID: 400282

Historic Scotland Designation Reference: LB51395

Building Class: Cultural

Location: Edinburgh

County: Edinburgh

Town: Edinburgh

Electoral Ward: Corstorphine/Murrayfield

Traditional County: Midlothian

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Description

MacGibbon and Ross, dated 1877 (Nos. 7, 8, 9 built 1880). 2-storey and attic 2-bay terraced townhouses with prominent shaped gables, timber dormers and canted bays. Coursed squared random rubble with some ashlar dressings. Banded base course; banded cill course at 1st floor. Deeply overhanging eaves with timber dentils. Large sandstone gable breaking wallhead above canted bays, with scalloped corners. Small timber dormers at attic with timber finials and deep eaves. Raised sandstone ashlar surrounds to main doorways with consoled cornice; 2-leaf timber doors with plain rectangular fanlights above. Raised ashlar window surrounds; round arched windows to attic dormers.

Predominantly plate glass in timber sash and case windows. Pitched roof, grey slates; corniced ashlar ridge stacks with modern clay cans. Cast-iron rainwater goods.

INTERIOR: characterised by ornate decorative classical scheme with cornicing and some fireplaces throughout. Large ground and 1st floor drawing rooms incorporating canted bays. Cantilevered dog leg stairs with corniced cupolas. Some conversion to flats (2009).

Statement of Interest

A well detailed terrace with bold features such as canted bays and large sandstone gables providing a significant contribution to the streetscape. The design is a synthesis of both Gothic and plain Classical design features with the individual houses grouped into pairs which are mirror images of one another. The composition of each townhouse is relatively tall and narrow, something which is further enhanced by the prominence of the gables.

MacGibbon and Ross were a highly successful Scottish architectural practice. They engaged in speculative property development from the 1870s onwards, with MacGibbon one of 7 principal shareholders in the Leith Heritages Company. The practice was badly affected by the City of Glasgow Bank crash of 1878, and this is likely to be the reason for the gap of three years between the construction of the first and second halves of the terrace.

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