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Edward VIII Post Box in the east gable wall of Forgandenny Post Office, excluding the Forgandenny Post Office, Post Office House and Forgandenny Garage, Main Road, Forgandenny

A Category B Listed Building in Almond and Earn, Perth and Kinross

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Coordinates

Latitude: 56.3462 / 56°20'46"N

Longitude: -3.4782 / 3°28'41"W

OS Eastings: 308731

OS Northings: 718073

OS Grid: NO087180

Mapcode National: GBR 1X.44K6

Mapcode Global: WH5PD.JRX9

Entry Name: Edward VIII Post Box in the east gable wall of Forgandenny Post Office, excluding the Forgandenny Post Office, Post Office House and Forgandenny Garage, Main Road, Forgandenny

Listing Date: 19 June 2019

Category: B

Source: Historic Scotland

Source ID: 407171

Historic Scotland Designation Reference: LB52507

Building Class: Cultural

Location: Forgandenny

County: Perth and Kinross

Electoral Ward: Almond and Earn

Parish: Forgandenny

Traditional County: Perthshire

Description

A 1936 wall mounted Ludlow-style cast iron post box, probably made by James Ludlow and Son of Birmingham. It is encased within a white painted timber frame built into a former window opening in the east gable elevation of Forgandenny Post Office.

The red painted rectangular box is 29 inches high and has a letter box slot with the 'E R' cipher and a crown in its upper third. The lower two thirds consist of a right hinged access door with a lock and an integral white enamelled sign below. The enamel sign also has the 'E R' cipher and a crown and reads 'POST OFFICE LETTER BOX, Notice: Letters containing coin, paper money or jewellery should not be posted in this box, but should be registered.' There is a separate small frame with collection times to the upper right.

In accordance with Section 1 (4A) of the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997 the following are excluded from the listing: the Forgandenny Post Office, Post Office House and Forgandenny Garage.

Historical development

Edward VIII came to the throne on 20th January 1936. He reigned for less than a year before his abdication on 10th December 1936.

The Ludlow-style of wall post boxes are so called because they were made by James Ludlow and Son of Birmingham (1885-1965). They were more economical than the large pillar boxes and were primarily installed at sub post offices. Many have been lost through the closure of the sub post office buildings which they served.

The Ludlow-style boxes did not carry the royal cyphers for Edward VII or Edward VIII, however, the two types are discernible from each other by different design details. The Edward VII boxes are 27 inches tall and the Edward VIII boxes are 2 inches taller at 29 inches. The Edward VIII boxes also had the double line warning notice added to the enamelled sign which reads 'Notice: Letters containing coin, paper money or jewellery should not be posted in this box, but should be registered.'

Statement of Interest

Forgandenny Post Box is an extremely rare example of a Ludlow-style wall post box made in 1936 during the reign of Edward VIII. It is believed to be one of only seven in continued use in the United Kingdom and the only known example in Scotland. It remains in both the position and form in which it was installed in 1936 and in particular, the survival of the lettering is extremely rare. The continued social historical interest in the abdication of Edward VIII who famously abdicated the throne for love over duty is also of special interest.

In accordance with Section 1 (4A) of the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997 the following are excluded from the listing: the Forgandenny Post Office, Post Office House and Forgandenny Garage.

Design

Forgandenny Post Box is a standard Ludlow-style wall box. Ludlow-style post boxes are not rare, however, the Forgandenny post box has significant interest because it is one of a very small number made during the short reign of Edward VIII. It has design details that are exclusive to the reign of Edward VIII such as the unusual enamel notice and its size.

Setting

The post box is clearly visible in the east gable of the post office when approached from the east. It remains in both the position and form in which it was installed in 1936. Wall mounted post boxes are prominently positioned in the walls of a post office or boundary walls. The setting of this box is not unusual.

The buildings together with the post box form a historic grouping within the conservation area.

Age and rarity

Edward VIII came to the throne of the United Kingdom on 20th January 1936. He reigned for less than a year before his abdication on 10th December 1936. The number of post boxes created during his reign was therefore correspondingly small to other monarchs and only a small number of post boxes installed during this period survive.

The majority of Edward VIII boxes were freestanding pillar boxes rather than wall boxes. Current information from the Letter Box Study Group (2019) suggests around 271 boxes were made in 1936, 171 of which were pillar boxes. It is thought that 171 boxes survive in the United Kingdom around 30 of which are in Scotland. There are around ten listed Edward VIII boxes in Scotland all of which are the pillar box type.

Forgandenny Post Box dates to 1936 and has significant interest because it was made and installed within the short reign of Edward VIII. Edward VIII wall post boxes are extremely rare with only seven known to remain in use in the United Kingdom. The other six examples are all in the south of England in Bawdsey in Suffolk, South Petherton and Martock in Somerset, Frant in Kent, Woburn in Buckinghamshire and Wortham in Norfolk. There are known to be another three decommissioned examples in private ownership.

Forgandenny is the only known example of a rare 1936 Edward VIII wall box of this type in Scotland and has unique interest for its age and rarity.

Social historical interest

The Post Box has some social historical interest as it represents the development of the postal communications of Forgandenny Village in the later 19th century. The continued social interest in commemorating Edward VIII as the king who abdicated the throne for love over duty in 1936 has added to the special interest of this type of post box.

Association with people or events of national importance

The Post Box has a close historical association with a person of national importance. The post box was installed within the short reign of King Edward VIII and is an extremely rare example of a wall post box from this period.

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