History in Structure

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Ty-yr-ychen, also known as Sker House farm buildings.

A Grade II Listed Building in Cynffig, Bridgend

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.505 / 51°30'17"N

Longitude: -3.7356 / 3°44'8"W

OS Eastings: 279638

OS Northings: 179877

OS Grid: SS796798

Mapcode National: GBR H5.JK2C

Mapcode Global: VH5HG.6FHM

Entry Name: Ty-yr-ychen, also known as Sker House farm buildings.

Listing Date: 1 June 1989

Last Amended: 2 January 1998

Grade: II

Source: Cadw

Source ID: 11360

Building Class: Agriculture and Subsistence

Location: Sker occupies the limestone peninsular S of Kenfig Sands, projecting into Swansea Bay. The long range of buildings lies approximately 100m E of Sker House.

County: Bridgend

Town: Cynffig

Community: Cornelly (Corneli)

Community: Cynffig

Locality: Sker

Traditional County: Glamorgan

Find accommodation in
North Cornelly

History

The outbuildings to Sker contain some medieval fabric, probably part of the grange of Neath Abbey. It was doubtless adapted for farm use after the Reformation, and has been extended in the C16-C17. The fine C18 barn at the E end is probably that 'new built barn' noted in the sale particulars of 1782 as being in range with an ox and wagon house. The two-bay structure joining the two is of the C18 or C19.

Exterior

The long range is aligned E-W, and built of local rubble limestone with slate roofs stepping up to the E in 2 stages. The W gable incorporates some medieval structure, probably part of a chimney breast of a building to the W, now lost. The range now constitutes a 7 bay farrowing house extending E of the gable, probably C17 in date, the middle section of which was converted into a cowhouse in the C18. One wide cart opening at the E end, two doorways and 2 windows, all with cambered heads, boarded doors and small-pane glazing. Slit ventilators on the N side have diagonally set projecting capping stones.

The barn at the E end has slightly projecting central porches each side with cambered brick arches covered by an extension of the roof; tall boarded doors on the N side. Three staggered slit ventilators each side of the central bay, some blocked. The upper section of the S door is blocked by a later arch and cut-down boarded doors. Similar slit ventilators.

The joining building, a feed store, has a single door opening each side.

Interior

The farrowing house range at the E end has 6 fine open trusses with chamfered principals rising from within the walls, with later applied collars, carrying 3 tiers of trenched purlins. Former tie beams of the entrance bay. Splayed windows to gables.

The ajoining building has a splayed opening with round arch, perhaps a medieval window.

The barn has four bolted A-frame trusses resting on wall plates. Flagged threshing floor. There is evidence for a former inserted floor at the W end. Gable window with splayed jambs into the joining building. Doorways with curved timber lintels to each end of the threshing floor.

Reasons for Listing

Included as a good group of farm buildings containing earlier fabric, and important to the group setting of Grade I Sker House.

Recommended Books

Other nearby listed buildings

  • I Sker House
    Located on a limestone promontory jutting west into Swansea Bay, approximately 4.2 kilometres N of Porthcawl, and reached by a long farm road leading W from the minor road from Porthcawl to Kenfig.
  • II The Rest
    At the very W end of the town, in a dominating position on the cliff, overlooking the sea and towards the docks and town.

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