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46 and 48, Ashfield Street

A Grade II Listed Building in Whitechapel, London

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.5166 / 51°30'59"N

Longitude: -0.0598 / 0°3'35"W

OS Eastings: 534721

OS Northings: 181526

OS Grid: TQ347815

Mapcode National: GBR ZB.QJ

Mapcode Global: VHGR0.X48Q

Entry Name: 46 and 48, Ashfield Street

Listing Date: 30 April 2003

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1096070

English Heritage Legacy ID: 490036

Location: Tower Hamlets, London, E1

County: London

District: Tower Hamlets

Electoral Ward/Division: Whitechapel

Built-Up Area: Tower Hamlets

Traditional County: Middlesex

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Greater London

Church of England Parish: St Dunstan Stepney

Church of England Diocese: London

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Listing Text


788/0/10178 ASHFIELD STREET
30-APR-03 46 AND 48

II

46-48 Ashfield Street. Pair of terraced houses. Mid 1820s. Stock brick with slate mansards, stone steps, cills and copings. Two storeys, basement and attics.
EXTERIOR: each house two windows wide. Arched doorcases to right with six-panel doors beneath decorative fanlights. To left, 6/6-pane sash windows with gauged arches over recessed basement lights. Similar windows to first floor; upper part of front wall of No 46 has been rebuilt. Mansard storey is probably a later C19 addition.
INTERIOR: not inspected.
HISTORY: this part of Ashfield Street was originally called Rutland Street, and these houses formed part of the development of the lands of London Hospital. An Act of 1802 led to the construction of the Commercial Road, thereby opening up Mile End Old Town for development. Horwood's map of 1819 shows the site as undeveloped; they are shown on Crutchley's map of 1829. These fourth-rate houses are the best survivals along this length of the street.

SOURCES: A. Kennedy-Clark, 'The London. A Study in the Voluntary Hospital System' (1962) I, 191-194.

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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