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Scraesdon Fort

A Grade II Listed Building in Antony, Cornwall

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Coordinates

Latitude: 50.3719 / 50°22'18"N

Longitude: -4.2613 / 4°15'40"W

OS Eastings: 239289

OS Northings: 54886

OS Grid: SX392548

Mapcode National: GBR NQ.TWTJ

Mapcode Global: FRA 18Y1.ZM8

Entry Name: Scraesdon Fort

Listing Date: 26 January 1987

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1140707

English Heritage Legacy ID: 61670

Location: Antony, Cornwall, PL11

County: Cornwall

Civil Parish: Antony

Traditional County: Cornwall

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Cornwall

Church of England Parish: Antony

Church of England Diocese: Truro

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Antony

Listing Text


SX 35 SE AND SX 35 NE ANTONY

2/15 & 5/15 Scraesdon Fort

II

Fort. Designed 1859, work started 1860, completed 1865. Snecked rockfaced limestone
rubble with stone dressings.
An irregular 5-sided fort with entrance to south east; surrounded by a moat. There
were 27 guns mounted on the ramparts, and the casements were covered by earth on the
northern side to act as a screen to prevent the interior work being seen from high
ground on the opposite side of the Lynher River about 200 yards away. Barracks/store
rooms around inner sides of walls. Flight to steps at north east side leading down
to the moat.
Entrance bay has parapet stepped up with splayed openings and 2 lancets; tall round-
headed doorway with roll-mouldings and pulleys right and left for the drawbridge,
lantern overthrow, double round-headed studded doors. To left of entrance, 12 bays,
each with triplet opening of central round-headed casement with voussoirs and narrow
single light to each side, 2 similar bays to right of entrance. 2-storey ravelin to
right with lancets, blocking course and hipped stone roof. Wall splayed forward to
left with lancetsf at ground floor.
The entrance has a round brick vaulted roof, with doorway to right to chambers,
lantern overthrow at inner arch. On each side of the inner walls, round-arched bays
in stone, each arch over central doorway with window opening to each side; parapet.
To north east side and south west, a double external stair giving access to the roof,
with arches under stairs. All rooms are brick vaulted. On north east side, the
tunnel. Circular caponier to north with gun emplacement, with central iron mounting
and circular pivoting track with degrees marked. This is a Moncrieff mounting.
In 1859, a Commission was formed "to consider the Defences of the United Kingdom",
after the pressure of public opinion following the new that the French Navy were
building iron-clad warships. This was set up by Palmerston. The design of the forts
was in the hands of the Royal Engineers, in the person of Colonel, late Lt General,
Sir W.F. Drummond Jarvis RE. Scraesdon Fort was one of the outer line of forts
defending Plymouth.
Ancient Monument no. 649.
(Sources: Rawlings, K.J.: Defence Works Plymouth Area 1300-1983. 1984)


Listing NGR: SX3928954886

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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