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Bank Barn with Waterwheel and Cartshed and Granary About 16 Metres West of Kernick Farmhouse

A Grade II Listed Building in Otterham, Cornwall

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Coordinates

Latitude: 50.6976 / 50°41'51"N

Longitude: -4.5886 / 4°35'18"W

OS Eastings: 217283

OS Northings: 91862

OS Grid: SX172918

Mapcode National: GBR N8.595G

Mapcode Global: FRA 1787.J4M

Entry Name: Bank Barn with Waterwheel and Cartshed and Granary About 16 Metres West of Kernick Farmhouse

Listing Date: 20 July 1987

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1143454

English Heritage Legacy ID: 68778

Location: Otterham, Cornwall, PL32

County: Cornwall

Civil Parish: Otterham

Traditional County: Cornwall

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Cornwall

Church of England Parish: Otterham, Saint Juliot and Lesnewth

Church of England Diocese: Truro

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Otterham

Listing Text

OTTERHAM
SX 19 SE
3/105 Bank barn with waterwheel and
cartshed and granary about 16
metres west of Kernick Farmhouse
II

Bank barn with waterwheel and adjoining cartshed with granary. Circa mid C19;
adjacent farmhouse has datestone 1871. Local stone rubble with granite lintels,
rendered rear wall of barn and slate-hung front to granary. Slate roofs, hipped over
bank-barn; lower gable-ended roof over cartshed and granary to left and lean-to slate
roof over waterwheel at right end.
Plan : Continuous long rectangular range; at the centre a bank barn consisting of a
shippon with a threshing barn above powered from a waterwheel at the right (west)
end; at the left (east) end a 4-bay open-fronted cartshed with a granary above which
has external stairs to a door in the gable end.
2 storeys. The barn has 3 shippon doorway openings on the ground floor with large
granite lintels; the centre opening is wider and slightly to left with a loading door
above which has a slated canopy on timber cantilevers and double doors.
To the left the 4-bay open-fronted cartshed has granite monolith posts supporting a
continuous timber bressumer above which is the slate-hung front to the granary which
has 2 small rectangular ventilation holes in the slate-hanging. In left hand gable
end are slate steps to the first floor granary doorway with a plank door. There are
no openings in the back wall of the cartshed and granary.
At the back of the bank barn the shippon on the ground floor has ventilation slits
and the barn above has a wide doorway with double doors opposite the front loading
doorway, also with a slated canopy on timber cantilevers; the doorway is reached by a
slate bridge over the ditch which separates the barn from the higher ground level
behind. To the left a small square hatch on the first floor of the barn.
On the right (west) end of the barn an overshot waterwheel in a pit covered by a
lean-to roof which is supported on a stone rubble side wall; the cast-iron waterwheel
survives and has wooden buckets, but the rest of the machinery has been dismantled
and removed; the wooden launder has collapsed.
Interior : The 6-bay barn roof and the 5-bay granary roof have bolted soft-wood
trusses with tie-beams and collars.
The adjacent Kernick Farmhouse has a datestone of 1871, but it incorporates a reused
3-light granite mullion window with a hood mould. The earlier house is said to have
been destroyed by a fire.


Listing NGR: SX1728391862

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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