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Blendworth Point

A Grade II Listed Building in Roehampton, London

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.4466 / 51°26'47"N

Longitude: -0.2362 / 0°14'10"W

OS Eastings: 522670

OS Northings: 173429

OS Grid: TQ226734

Mapcode National: GBR 9Q.R3D

Mapcode Global: VHGR3.VWHY

Entry Name: Blendworth Point

Listing Date: 22 December 1998

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1246030

English Heritage Legacy ID: 472022

Location: Wandsworth, London, SW15

County: London

District: Wandsworth

Electoral Ward/Division: Roehampton

Built-Up Area: Wandsworth

Traditional County: Surrey

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Greater London

Church of England Parish: Roehampton Holy Trinity

Church of England Diocese: Southwark

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Listing Text

TQ 22 73 WANDSWORTH, LB WANBOROUGH DRIVE
(west side)

1207/11/10057 Blendworth Point

GV II

Point block of 42 flats. Designed 1951, built 1952-5 by London County Council Architect's Department Housing Division; Rosemary Stjernstedt Architect in Charge, A W Cleeve Barr and Oliver Cox principal job architects. Ove Arup and Partners, engineers. In-situ reinforced concrete frame, clad in grey 'clinker block' brickwork, with some expression of the concrete floors as bands in the composition. Flat roof with projecting service tower expressed as rounded sculptural form. 3 flats on ground floor, four on each upper floor (one 1-bedroom and three 2-bedroom units) set in corners of picturesquely asymmetrical plan, with partially projecting balconies at corners. Lift lobby runs through centre of building, with pair of lifts serving alternate floors and two escape staircases, once brightly coloured. Ground floor partially set back and painted, with storerooms which retain their original galvanised steel fenestration, as do the staircases. Windows to flats renewed in UPVC-coated aluminium within original openings and to similar pattern (some mullions eliminated). Balconies with original panelled fronts. Each block denoted by different patterned tilework at entrance formed of white and two varieties of black and white speckled tiles to give illusion of contrasting grey and near-black; the pattern at Blendworth Point with cross-shape of white outlined with large areas of near-black. Original sign made of tiles. The point blocks at Alton East were the first public housing in Britain to have mechanically-ventilated lavatories and bathrooms, and the first high housing to have central heating. The interiors of the flats are not of special interest except for their plan.
The LCC's earlier experiments with point block design had been expensive, later variants were more mechanical; these are included as a pioneering design and the first cluster in Britain. The name 'point block' was coined by the Alton East team from the Swedish 'punkthus', one source of their inspiration. Another was the English housing tradition, which led to their use of brick, respect for earlier LCC work nearby and an interest in what prospective tenants wanted.
Alton East is remarkable for its picturesque massing, which maximises its sloping site and the retention and enhancement of Victorian planting from gardens to villas previously there, by grouping the points at the top of the rise (where they also shield traffic noise) and setting the contrasting red-brick houses and maisonettes round them. It epitomises the humanist tradition in post-war British architecture.

Listing NGR: TQ2267073429

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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