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Grace Gates at Lord's Cricket Ground

A Grade II Listed Building in Regent's Park, London

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.5287 / 51°31'43"N

Longitude: -0.1721 / 0°10'19"W

OS Eastings: 526894

OS Northings: 182675

OS Grid: TQ268826

Mapcode National: GBR 56.J5

Mapcode Global: VHGQR.YTWY

Entry Name: Grace Gates at Lord's Cricket Ground

Listing Date: 7 February 1996

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1246985

English Heritage Legacy ID: 456104

Location: Westminster, London, NW8

County: London

District: City of Westminster

Electoral Ward/Division: Regent's Park

Built-Up Area: City of Westminster

Traditional County: Middlesex

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Greater London

Church of England Parish: St Mark Hamilton Terrace

Church of England Diocese: London

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Listing Text

TQ 2682 NE ST JOHN'S WOOD ROAD
(north side)
1900-/22/10093 Grace Gates at Lord's
Cricket Ground

GV II

Gates and flanking walls and piers, erected as a memorial to W G Grace in 1923 by Herbert Baker. Cast-iron gates set within exedra of Portland stone. Two pairs of gates topped with motif of cricket ball surrounded by sun's rays, either side of central pier with single triglyph of cricket stumps under urn with English lion. In centre an inscription: 'TO THE MEMORY OF WILLIAM GILBERT GRACE THE GREAT CRICKETER: 1848-1915: THESE GATES WERE ERECTED: THE MCC AND OTHER FRIENDS AND ADMIRERS'. The gates set within an exedra of curved walls with moulded cornice and base. Piers with urns; swags and voussoirs over low doors giving pedestrian access to either side.
W G Grace played first-class cricket for 43 years. He was the unrivalled champion of English cricket in the late nineteenth century when the game was established in its present form.
Source: Herbert Baker, Architecture and Personalities, 1944, p.18.


Listing NGR: TQ2689482675

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Description

TQ 2682 NE ST JOHN'S WOOD ROAD
(north side)
1900-/22/10093 Grace Gates at Lord's
Cricket Ground

GV II

Gates and flanking walls and piers, erected as a memorial to W G Grace in 1923 by Herbert Baker. Cast-iron gates set within exedra of Portland stone. Two pairs of gates topped with motif of cricket ball surrounded by sun's rays, either side of central pier with single triglyph of cricket stumps under urn with English lion. In centre an inscription: 'TO THE MEMORY OF WILLIAM GILBERT GRACE THE GREAT CRICKETER: 1848-1915: THESE GATES WERE ERECTED: THE MCC AND OTHER FRIENDS AND ADMIRERS'. The gates set within an exedra of curved walls with moulded cornice and base. Piers with urns; swags and voussoirs over low doors giving pedestrian access to either side.
W G Grace played first-class cricket for 43 years. He was the unrivalled champion of English cricket in the late nineteenth century when the game was established in its present form.
Source: Herbert Baker, Architecture and Personalities, 1944, p.18.


Listing NGR: TQ2689482675

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