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Berry Farm

A Grade II Listed Building in Kingsteignton, Devon

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Coordinates

Latitude: 50.5459 / 50°32'45"N

Longitude: -3.5922 / 3°35'31"W

OS Eastings: 287283

OS Northings: 73004

OS Grid: SX872730

Mapcode National: GBR QS.C0R4

Mapcode Global: FRA 37CM.8CS

Entry Name: Berry Farm

Listing Date: 28 April 1987

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1334276

English Heritage Legacy ID: 85390

Location: Kingsteignton, Teignbridge, Devon, TQ12

County: Devon

Civil Parish: Kingsteignton

Built-Up Area: Kingsteignton

Traditional County: Devon

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Devon

Church of England Parish: Kingsteignton St Michael

Church of England Diocese: Exeter

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Kingsteignton

Listing Text

KINGSTEIGNTON FORE STREET, Kingsteignton
SX 87 SE
5/133 No 68 (Berry Farm)

GV II

House, formerly farmhouse. C17 or earlier origins with some subsequent remodelling
and rear additions of the 1920s. Whitewashed and rendered, cob and stone; local reed
thatched roof, gabled at left end with plain ridge; right end stack with brick
shaft, rear lateral stack at junction with 1920s additions.
Interior evidence suggests that the C17 plan was 3 rooms and a through passage, the
lower end to the right, the hall heated by the lateral stack and an unheated inner
room. There may have been an external stair turret on the rear wall of the hall
adjacent to the stack. The first floor lower end room retains a moulded plaster
cornice and appears to have been the principal first floor room. A rear right wing
may have been a C17 service room, a kitchen or dairy, with an upper storey added at a
later date. A wide stair has been inserted in the passage and the hall and inner
room roof trusses may be replacements. In the 1920s a rear left addition under a 2-
span roof provided additional accommodation. There is a possibility that the origins
of the house are late medieval and the visible early evidence at time of survey
(1986) suggests a C17 remodelling an open hall house.
2 storeys. Asymmetrical 2 window front, the eaves thatch eyebrowed over first floor
window right. Shallow gabled C20 porch to right of centre leading into former
passage, now stair hall. Fenestration of C19 and C20 casements with glazing bars,
the embrasures probably C19.
Interior : Several early features of interest in a modernised interior. Both hall
screens survive, the passage screen has chamfered muntins with low diagonal stops,
the higher end screen is less complete and plainer. A blocked doorway adjacent to
the hall fireplace has narrow chamfered jambs with scroll stops and may have lead to
a stair turret. Thin exposed joists to the hall and lower end room are probably C18
or later replacements. The ground floor of the rear right wing has a chamfered
stopped cross beam. The 2 right hand trusses are boxed in but appear to be jointed
crucks with a moulded plaster cornice carried out round the principals and continued
into the cupboard over the stairs. The trusses over the hall and inner room have
straight principals and may be later replacements. No access to roofspace at time of
survey (1986) but the apexes of the roof trusses are likely to be of interest.
Berry Farm is on a prominent corner site in Kingsteignton and is an interesting
survival of a former farmhouse close to the town centre.


Listing NGR: SX8728373004

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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