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Barn at Farleigh Plain

A Grade II Listed Building in Hinton Charterhouse, Bath and North East Somerset

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.3221 / 51°19'19"N

Longitude: -2.2989 / 2°17'55"W

OS Eastings: 379269

OS Northings: 158156

OS Grid: ST792581

Mapcode National: GBR 0RC.1LX

Mapcode Global: VH971.31J9

Plus Code: 9C3V8PC2+VF

Entry Name: Barn at Farleigh Plain

Listing Date: 17 December 2008

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1393062

English Heritage Legacy ID: 504845

Location: Hinton Charterhouse, Bath and North East Somerset, BA2

County: Bath and North East Somerset

Civil Parish: Hinton Charterhouse

Traditional County: Somerset

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Somerset

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Description

HINTON CHARTERHOUSE

240/0/10009 IFORD LANE
17-DEC-08 Barn at Farleigh Plain

GV II
A threshing barn, dating from the C18, constructed from local oolitic limestone, squared and brought to course, set under a slate roof. The barn, which is aligned east-west, is rectangular on plan, with a large porch projecting to the south.

EXTERIOR: The building is of three, roughly equal bays; the main elevation, to the south, has a large gabled porch, the gable filled in with red brick; the double doors have been replaced with weatherboarding and a C20 timber-framed, fixed-light window. There are ground-floor doorways to either side, each with re-used C19 doors. The east end has an inserted window to the ground floor, with a square taking-in door above. The west end has a rectangular owl-hole set high in the gable, with a small window in a reduced opening below. The rear elevation has a pair of large double doors under a heavy timber lintel, with boards across the bottom of the opening. To either side, under the eaves, is a square ventilator, now boarded.

INTERIOR: The eastern bay is ceiled and divided from the rest of the barn by a later timber partition. The inserted floor dates from the later C19 or C20. The threshing area of the barn is floored with wide timber boards. The roof structure is based on three trusses formed from tie beam and lapped principal rafters, with single trenched purlins and a small yoke.

SUBSIDIARY FEATURES: To the west end and extending southwards for a distance of circa 24 metres from the end of the barn, is a high wall of squared and coursed limestone with limestone capping, defining the extent of the yard beyond. The wall dates from the C19.

HISTORY: The buildings at Farleigh Plain appear to have originated in the C18 as a farmstead, comprising a house with attached dairy, threshing barn, and outbuildings. The farm may have been associated with nearby Iford Manor. The house was gentrified in the early C19, and at the same time, a wall was constructed extending southward from the west end of the barn, to screen the foldyard from the house. Lean-to extensions were added to either side of the large porch in the C19, and removed in the later C20 or early C21.

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION:
The barn at Farleigh Plain is designated at Grade II, for the following principal reasons:
* The barn is a substantial threshing barn dating from the C18, which has been little altered since its construction
* The building retains its timber threshing floor, taking-in door and ventilators, which clearly demonstrate its function
* The insertion of a floor in the eastern end of the barn, and the closure of its southern threshing bay illustrate its continued evolution throughout its life as an agricultural building

Reasons for Listing

* The barn is a substantial threshing barn dating from the C18, which has been little altered since its construction
* The building retains its timber threshing floor, taking-in door and ventilators, which clearly demonstrate its function
* The insertion of a floor in the eastern end of the barn, and the closure of its southern threshing bay, illustrate its continued evolution throughout its life as an agricultural building

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