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5-10, Old Bond Street

A Grade II Listed Building in Bath, Bath and North East Somerset

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.3829 / 51°22'58"N

Longitude: -2.361 / 2°21'39"W

OS Eastings: 374974

OS Northings: 164928

OS Grid: ST749649

Mapcode National: GBR 0QH.9WP

Mapcode Global: VH96M.1H6R

Entry Name: 5-10, Old Bond Street

Listing Date: 12 June 1950

Last Amended: 15 October 2010

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1396212

English Heritage Legacy ID: 511618

Location: Bath and North East Somerset, BA1

County: Bath and North East Somerset

Electoral Ward/Division: Abbey

Built-Up Area: Bath

Traditional County: Somerset

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Somerset

Church of England Parish: Bath St Michael Without

Church of England Diocese: Bath and Wells

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Listing Text

OLD BOND STREET
(East side)

Nos.5-10 (Consec)
12/06/50

GV II

Six terrace houses with shops. c1780 with C19 and C20 additions.
MATERIALS: Limestone ashlar, mainly painted, but not to upper floors of Nos 5-8, roof not visible.
EXTERIOR: Three storeys, each in one bay, in normal treatment tripartite eight:twelve:eight pane sash above similar Palladian window, centre light with interlaced bars. No.7 has been altered, retaining two lights of tripartite sash, third blocked, and new light inserted to left, also at first floor centre light has been dropped, with small balconette, and extra light inserted to left. The shopfronts are varied. No.5 has a triple `oriel' with small-pane transom lights to common fascia with cornice (1882, altered, by C Wibley, Builder on the Burton Street side, c1800 with later windows on south end, and 1869, altered on Old Bond Street side). No.6 paired front with recessed central door, to fascia and cornice (mid/late C19 on Old Bond Street side and late C19 with later windows on Burton Street side). Nos 7 and 8 have good undulating bow fronts with shallow entablatures, with plain glazing and centre door with transom light, but in twenty panes each side of central door to No.8, also has further door to left (No.7 early C19, altered early C20 on Old Bond street side. And 1907 by Speckam and Son on Burton Street. No.8 early C19). Nos 9 and ten have late C20 plate glass fronts (1967, by Rolfe and Crozier-Cole), returned at south end. Severe detail with cornice, blocking course and parapet, and small square eaves stack between Nos 6 and 7. North end, facing Milsom Street, has small niche with putti on plinth at first floor above C19 pilaster shopfront with recessed door, right, and modillion cornice, blocking course swept down at centre to fine carved Royal Arms with supporters. South end has clockface above twelve pane sash, and front to Old Bond Street has seven twelve pane and smaller light above five twelve pane, three of these with balconettes, plain paired sash, and two deep fifteen pane, all above various shopfronts. Above ground floor platband, with BOND STREET incised, and small cove cornice. Three ashlar stacks at centre.
INTERIORS: Not inspected.
HISTORY: This narrow block stood close to the former wide market space, possibly on the sit of earlier buildings, just outside the mediaeval wall. It forms a very shallow, but prominent, range. The masonry fronts display evidence of straight jointing, suggesting that the construction may not have been carried out in one stage.
SOURCES: G. Finch, Shopfront Record (Bath City Council, 1992).

Listing NGR: ST7497464928

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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