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Stonnall Village Animal Pound

A Grade II Listed Building in Stonnall, Staffordshire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 52.6308 / 52°37'50"N

Longitude: -1.8918 / 1°53'30"W

OS Eastings: 407417

OS Northings: 303672

OS Grid: SK074036

Mapcode National: GBR 3D0.2HN

Mapcode Global: WHBFW.X49J

Plus Code: 9C4WJ4J5+87

Entry Name: Stonnall Village Animal Pound

Listing Date: 27 May 2016

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1434683

Location: Shenstone, Lichfield, Staffordshire, WS9

County: Staffordshire

Civil Parish: Shenstone

Built-Up Area: Stonnall

Traditional County: Staffordshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Staffordshire

Church of England Parish: Stonnall St Peter

Church of England Diocese: Lichfield

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Summary


An animal pound, probably dating from the C18, with some earlier fabric, repaired in the C19 and restored and partially rebuilt in the early C21.

Description

An animal pound, probably dating from the C18, with some earlier fabric, repaired in the C19 and restored and partially rebuilt in the early C21.

MATERIALS: its walls are constructed in red brick with lime mortar, with dark fired brick bull nosed copings.

PLAN: it encloses a trapezium shaped area of c 23 m².

EXTERIOR: the walls to the pound are c 1.2m high and have diagonally set buttresses to the corners. The brick is laid in stretcher bond with sections in header bond. A timber gate is hung in a central opening in the slightly thicker west wall, giving access to the pound.

INTERIOR: the floor inside the pound is covered in gravel.

History

Animal pounds, or pinfolds, were common from the Medieval period onwards, and were used to confine straying (illegal) animals or cattle, or to round up (legally) grazing animals during certain periods of the year from areas of common grazing rights. They can be difficult to date due to lack of documentary evidence, and are rare to survive. The animal pound at Stonnall probably dates from the C18. The earliest documentary evidence of its existence is the Shenstone Enclosure Map of 1811, on which it is clearly marked. At that time Stonnall consisted of two small hamlets, Upper and Lower Stonnall, which were entirely agricultural and the pound would have been positioned roughly midway between them. The land and villages would have been at that time part of the Little Aston Estate. A recent survey undertaken prior to its recent restoration in the early C21, as part of a Local Heritage Initiative supported by Lichfield District Council, has indicated that parts of its fabric may be of much earlier date, whilst other parts constitute C19 repairs.

Reasons for Listing

The former animal pound at Stonnall, probably dating from the C18, with some earlier fabric, repaired in the C19 and restored and partially rebuilt in the early C21, merits listing at Grade II for the following principal reasons:

* Historical interest: pounds are listed as interesting survivals of past agricultural methods and this C18 example, containing earlier fabric, is an interesting reminder of rural life during that period;

* Rarity of building type: pounds are routinely listed because of the degree of attrition they have undergone - only about 200 are currently listed in England;

* Degree of intactness: the loss of historic fabric has not affected its special interest and its sensitive restoration has ensured that the structure can be fully understood and enjoyed by the local community.


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