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Glenbranter, Bridgend, Bridge over the River Cur

A Category B Listed Building in Strachur, Argyll and Bute

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Coordinates

Latitude: 56.1374 / 56°8'14"N

Longitude: -5.0375 / 5°2'14"W

OS Eastings: 211356

OS Northings: 698010

OS Grid: NS113980

Mapcode National: GBR 01.K89G

Mapcode Global: WH1K2.LZDW

Entry Name: Glenbranter, Bridgend, Bridge over the River Cur

Listing Date: 28 August 1980

Category: B

Source: Historic Scotland

Source ID: 352196

Historic Scotland Designation Reference: LB18186

Building Class: Cultural

Location: Strachur

County: Argyll and Bute

Electoral Ward: Cowal

Parish: Strachur

Traditional County: Argyllshire

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Description

Loch Lomond And Trossachs National Park Planning Authority

This bridge over the River Cur at Glenbranter is a good example of an early 19th century 2-arched bridge, surviving in original condition. It is recognised for its condition, quality and historic value as part of the reconstruction of the road from Strachur to Ardentinny after 1806.

This bridge was part of the earlier road S from Strachur to Ardentinny and Dunoon, which ran on the W side of the river N of Glenbranter, before crossing at this point. The bridge is almost flat, with only a slight rise at the centre and is entirely of rubble, with two wide segmental arches. On both the upstream and downstream side is a single cutwater. The parapet has rough rubble coping. The soffit has been cement-rendered.

Statement of Interest

The Commission for Highland Roads and Bridges was founded in 1803 and was responsible for the routes of many of the roads still in use. In this case, the Commission saw that a lack of good communications between Loch Fyne and Glasgow was affecting the fishing industry and decided to construct a new road from Strachur to Ardentinny to aid in the transport of fish, salt and casks (Haldane, 1962, 67). A contract for the construction of the road allows for a number of bridges, one of which has two arches of 16 feet each, which is thought to be this bridge.

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