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Main Street, Rose Cottage

A Category C Listed Building in Kelso and District, Scottish Borders

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Coordinates

Latitude: 55.5448 / 55°32'41"N

Longitude: -2.2879 / 2°17'16"W

OS Eastings: 381928

OS Northings: 627931

OS Grid: NT819279

Mapcode National: GBR D4GB.G5

Mapcode Global: WH8Y7.TWPP

Entry Name: Main Street, Rose Cottage

Listing Date: 29 November 1993

Category: C

Source: Historic Scotland

Source ID: 353755

Historic Scotland Designation Reference: LB19418

Building Class: Cultural

Location: Yetholm

County: Scottish Borders

Electoral Ward: Kelso and District

Parish: Yetholm

Traditional County: Roxburghshire

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Kirk Yetholm

Description

Mid to late 18th century with mid-20th century alterations. Two-storey, four-bay, thatched house with single storey wing to south and byre to west. Rendered to street elevations and heavily pointed whinstone rubble to rear. Red-tiled cills.

East (entrance) elevation: porch in bay to left of centre. Tripartite windows to both floors in outer bays. First floor windows breaking eaves with thatched hoods. Bipartite windows to both floors in bay to right of centre. Tripartite window to single storey wing and bipartite windows clasping angle.

West (rear) elevation: timber lintel to doorway with modern glazed door. Irregular size and distribution of windows. Byre adjoining to left and forge adjoining to right.

Small-pane timber casement windows. Reed-thatched roof with chicken-wire covering, turf ridge. Harled gablehead chimneystacks.

Byre and Forge: whinstone rubble byre with timber lintels to openings, boarded two-leaf doors and roof with purple slates. East gable wall demolished and boarded over. Single storey rubble outbuilding with corrugated-iron roof, reputed to have been forge.

Statement of Interest

Rose Cottage appears to have been much altered subsequent to the photograph published in the Roxburgh Inventory - the openings have been enlarged, a porch added, a new window cut across the angle of the single storey wing, and the roof re-thatched to form hoods to the first floor windows. The reconditioning owes more to the Arts and Crafts movement than Scottish vernacular tradition.

It is among a relatively small number of traditional buildings with a surviving thatched roof found across Scotland. A Survey of Thatched Buildings in Scotland, published in 2016 by the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB), found there were only around 200 buildings of this type remaining, most of which are found in small rural communities. Thatched buildings are often traditionally built, showing distinctive local and regional building methods and materials. Those that survive are important in helping us understand these traditional skills and an earlier way of life.

Listed building record revised in 2019 as part of the Thatched Buildings Listing Review 2017-19.

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