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Parish Church of St Dochdwy

A Grade II Listed Building in Llanfair (Llan-fair), Vale of Glamorgan

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.4466 / 51°26'47"N

Longitude: -3.4469 / 3°26'48"W

OS Eastings: 299543

OS Northings: 172949

OS Grid: SS995729

Mapcode National: GBR HK.N5PD

Mapcode Global: VH6F8.6WLX

Plus Code: 9C3RCHW3+J6

Entry Name: Parish Church of St Dochdwy

Listing Date: 22 February 1963

Last Amended: 22 September 1995

Grade: II

Source: Cadw

Source ID: 13152

Building Class: Religious, Ritual and Funerary

Location: Located at the centre of Llandough village, to the S of Llandough castle, within the Castle precincts.

County: Vale of Glamorgan

Community: Llanfair (Llan-fair)

Community: Llanfair

Locality: Llandough

Traditional County: Glamorgan

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History

The parish church of Llandough has C14 origins and stands within the precincts of Llandough castle, home to the Walsche family during the medieval period. The church was restored in 1869 by Charles Buckeridge (pupil of Sir George Gilbert Scott) in the First Pointed Victorian Gothic Style.

Exterior

Coursed limestone rubble elevations beneath a slated roof which steps down towards the chancel. It comprises a chancel, nave, south porch, nave and bellcote at the western end, containing two bells. The E window is of three lights with trefoil heads, the central light stepping up to the top of the depressed arch, with plate tracery in the head, all beneath a hoodmould. The chancel is lit on the S side by three C19 trefoil-headed lancets. Set at a high level on the SE corner of the nave is a small C16 style, square-headed, leaded light which formerly lit the rood loft behind. To the E of the S porch are a pair of C19 trefoil-headed lancets, beneath relieving arches and an early single trefoil-headed lancet to the W of the porch. The S porch has a coped gabled, slated roof with Celtic wheel cross finial and two centred outer doorway and chamfered moulded stone jambs with broach stops, surmounted a hoodmould with head stops. The porch has an early C16 collar purlin roof, with decorated wall plate with carved stylised roses and moulded collar purlin with foliate bosses and the face of Christ to the centre. The inner doorway is round headed with flanking stone benches. The W elevation is heavily battered and has a pair of trefoil-headed lights at high level. The N side of the nave is unlit with stair outshut to E end. The N side of the chancel has a flat topped doorway with shoulders leading to the C19 vestry. The E end of the vestry has a C19 two-light trefoil-headed window.

Interior

The chancel arch, much of the fenestration, pews, pulpit and chancel screen were replaced in the restoration of 1869. The chancel roof is a C19 wagon roof formed by a series of closely set arched braces and the sanctuary roof is panelled. The nave retains the original C14 cradle roof. the octagonal font is of C14 date. To the N of the sanctuary is a brass of a woman in medieval costume dated 1426, depicting the wife of Walter Moreton, constable of Cardiff. The churchyard is enclosed by a high limestone, revetment rubble wall, while to the S of the church there is an inner and outer wall measuring approximately 2.5m with carriageway to Llandough Castle. There is a tablet mounted on the inside of the outer wall dated 1851.

Reasons for Listing

Listed grade II as a small parish church with medieval origins illustrating later C19 restoration.

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