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Bryn Tirion

A Grade II Listed Building in Llanddulas and Rhyd-y-Foel (Llanddulas a Rhyd-y-Foel), Conwy

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Coordinates

Latitude: 53.2865 / 53°17'11"N

Longitude: -3.6363 / 3°38'10"W

OS Eastings: 291010

OS Northings: 377867

OS Grid: SH910778

Mapcode National: GBR 3Z1F.JL

Mapcode Global: WH657.3NPB

Entry Name: Bryn Tirion

Listing Date: 12 November 1997

Last Amended: 12 November 1997

Grade: II

Source: Cadw

Source ID: 19034

Building Class: Domestic

Location: Raised up on a triangular plot between Clipterfyn Road and New Road, some 750m SE of the village centre.

County: Conwy

Town: Abergele

Community: Llanddulas and Rhyd-y-Foel (Llanddulas a Rhyd-y-Foel)

Community: Llanddulas and Rhyd-y-Foel

Locality: Llanddulas

Traditional County: Denbighshire

Find accommodation in
Llysfaen

History

Early C20 house in Edwardian Arts and Crafts vernacular style. The house is not shown in photographs of the site dated 1910, yet there is decorators' graffiti on the base plaster dated 1911, thereby establishing this as the year of construction. A storeyed extension and garage were added to the NE c1933 for a Mr. Whittaker, J.P. The style and individuality of this building suggests that it may be the work of Herbert North, architect of Llanfairfechan.

Exterior

Storeyed house of irregular plan form comprising a main T-shaped range with an adjoining angled service range and later additions beyond. Of roughcast brick construction with slate-hung gables and original graded slate roof with gently feathered eaves; mostly original casement windows in 6-pane combinations. The main entrance is on the N side and has a segmental stone arch with tripartite glazed doorway; inner porch with 15-panel main door, the upper 3 panels leaded. Above, a half-hipped gabled dormer and to the R a gabled lateral chimney, the stack with characteristic elliptical profile and projecting vents. To the L of the entrance a projecting cross-wing with flat-roofed canted bay window to the ground floor and a slate-hung gabled upper floor; rectangular central stack. To the rear a hipped catslide roof to a primary, single-storey garden room extruded in the angle between the main and cross ranges. This is of wooden construction with pegged oak posts, the infill sections formerly weather-boarded, though now with plastic imitation. Half-hipped gabled dormer to first floor as before, with tripartite window. Further plain lateral chimney to angled section at R.

Adjoining to the NE, a later storeyed and gabled wing, construction as before. An arched ground-floor cross-passage (formerly open) leads to the rear between it and the primary house. Canted first-floor oriel windows to both front and rear gables, with decorative pargetting. Adjoining this to the NE is a contemporary single-storey, flat-roofed garage.

Interior

Simple, restrained interior detailing, with 2-panel doors and plain moulded architraves. Half well stair with off-set stick balusters and moulded oak rail, newels and pendants; galleried landing and panelled stair cupboard. Moulded picture and dado rails to ground-floor rooms, with later (1930s) Jacobethan plasterwork and fireplaces. Single-flight rear stair with balusters and rail as before and a large glazed top light; further plasterwork decoration. Double-arched opening within balustraded gallery with wooden. fictive wrought iron, Chinoiserie-style overthrow. Two segmental arches to first-floor passage, with similar openwork overthrows, of Jacobean and Art Nouveau inspiration respectively. Bathroom with contemporary green and cream dado tiles with Art Nouveau-style foliate insertions. The majority of the original interior fittings survive including cast iron radiators, brass door furniture and brass multiple light switch panels. Large first-floor billiard room to addition, with walnut grained door, lincrusta dado panelling and Rococo-style imitation plasterwork to segmental barrel vault.

Reasons for Listing

Listed as a well-conceived early C20 Arts and Crafts house, perhaps designed by the important regional architect H.L North.

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