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36, Whiting Street

A Grade II Listed Building in Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk

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Coordinates

Latitude: 52.2416 / 52°14'29"N

Longitude: 0.7135 / 0°42'48"E

OS Eastings: 585360

OS Northings: 263850

OS Grid: TL853638

Mapcode National: GBR QF0.F6V

Mapcode Global: VHKD4.BX1G

Entry Name: 36, Whiting Street

Listing Date: 12 July 1972

Last Amended: 30 October 1997

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1096765

English Heritage Legacy ID: 467776

Location: Bury St. Edmunds, St. Edmundsbury, Suffolk, IP33

County: Suffolk

District: St. Edmundsbury

Civil Parish: Bury St Edmunds

Built-Up Area: Bury St Edmunds

Traditional County: Suffolk

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Suffolk

Church of England Parish: Bury St Edmunds St Mary

Church of England Diocese: St.Edmundsbury and Ipswich

Find accommodation in
Bury Saint Edmunds

Listing Text


BURY ST EDMUNDS

TL8563NW WHITING STREET
639-1/15/705 (East side)
12/07/72 No.36
(Formerly Listed as:
WHITING STREET
(East side)
Nos.36 AND 38)

II

House. C15, with later alterations and extensions at rear.
Timber-framed; roughcast exterior with applied mock timbering;
plaintiled roof.
EXTERIOR: 2 storeys, cellar and attics: contains the 2 bays of
an open hall. 2 window range: 2-light casement windows with a
single bar to the 1st storey and small-paned sashes in flush
cased frames on the ground storey. A 6-panel door in a wood
doorcase with moulded architrave and pediment.
INTERIOR: a small cellar below the rear extensions has one
wall of large kidney flints, the rest brick lined. Good
studding partly exposed inside. A fine crown-post roof,
lightly smoke blackened, the crown post with a short octagonal
shaft and moulded cap and base, braced 4 ways at the head. A
second layer of rafters has been laid over the original roof.
Slightly smoke-blackened plaster between the studs of the
north wall at attic level. The crown-post stands on a heavily
cambered tie beam, ogee moulded, with chamfered solid arched
braces meeting at the centre with a short blocking piece. The
end wall on the north has only the tie-beam and one surviving
long arched brace; no evidence of original studding below the
tie-beam, which suggests that the house was butted up against
an earlier building.
The chimney-stack was inserted at the upper end of the hall
and serves both Nos 36 and 38 (qv), the latter formerly the
cross-wing associated with the open hall, but now separately
occupied. The open fireplace has a damaged timber lintel and
the brickwork has the remains of original mortar. The inserted
ceiling has heavy chamfered cross-beams and plain unchamfered
joists set flat.

Listing NGR: TL8536063850

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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