History in Structure

This site is entirely user-supported. See how you can help.

Luton Barton House

A Grade II Listed Building in Broadhembury, Devon

Approximate Location Map
Large Map »
Street View
Contributor Photos »

Street View is the best available vantage point looking, if possible, towards the location of the building. In some locations, Street View may not give a view of the actual building, or may not be available at all. Where it is not available, the satellite view is shown instead.

Coordinates

Latitude: 50.8184 / 50°49'6"N

Longitude: -3.3031 / 3°18'11"W

OS Eastings: 308299

OS Northings: 102904

OS Grid: ST082029

Mapcode National: GBR LR.XR10

Mapcode Global: FRA 36ZX.T4W

Entry Name: Luton Barton House

Listing Date: 27 January 1989

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1098044

English Heritage Legacy ID: 87088

Location: Broadhembury, East Devon, Devon, EX14

County: Devon

District: East Devon

Civil Parish: Broadhembury

Traditional County: Devon

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Devon

Church of England Parish: Broadhembury St Andrew, Apostle and Martyr

Church of England Diocese: Exeter

Find accommodation in
Payhembury

Listing Text

BROADHEMBURY LUTON
ST 00 SE

4/85 Luton Barton House

GV II

House, formerly farmhouse. Late medieval origins, remodelled and extended in the
early C17, altered at the left (north) end in the C18 or C19. Whitewashed rendered
cob and stone rubble; thatched roof half-hipped at left end, gabled at right end with
plain ridge, rear wing half-hipped at end; right end stack, back to back fireplaces
in an axial stack to left of centre.
Plan: T plan. West-facing main range, 3 rooms wide, with the remains of a through
passage to right of centre. The right hand room is heated from an end stack, the 2
left hand rooms from the axial stack. An unheated rear wing at right angles to the
main range is unheated. The house originated as a late medieval open hall of which 2
blackened trusses survive. The wing, also of cruck construction, may be medieval as
well. The house was probably floored in the late C16/early C17 when the right end
stack was added; the axial stack to left of centre appears to be part of a post C17
rebuilding or alteration at this end of the house.
Exterior: 2 storeys. Asymmetrical 4 window front with a C19 panelled front door to
the former through passage to right of centre with a probably C19 hipped porch
canopy, 3 and 4-light timber casement windows with glazing bars, probably late C19 or
C20.
Interior: Plank and muntin screens to the passage, the right hand screen incomplete,
the left hand screen (higher side) with the remains of a blocked doorframe. The
right hand room is a lower end parlour with a chamfered crossbeam and a high quality
fireplace with moulded Beerstone jambs and a massive stone lintel. The room to the
loft of the passage has a ceiling of intersecting moulded beams. Integral with the
ceiling beams, about a metre in front of the stack is the head beam of a plank and
muntin screen indicating either that the present axial stack is part of an
enlargement of the room (perhaps replacing a lateral stack) or that the moulded beams
are entirely re-used. The fireplace has a massive late C19 grate.
Roof: 2 sooted trusses, presumably crucks, survive over the right and centre of the
main range, the rafters have been replaced. The rear wing has a side-pegged jointed
cruck roof structure with mortised collars and may be early C16.
A handsome traditional house of medieval origins. Group value with Salters Farmhouse
opposite.


Listing NGR: ST0829902904

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Other nearby listed buildings

BritishListedBuildings.co.uk is an independent online resource and is not associated with any government department. All government data published here is used under licence. Please do not contact BritishListedBuildings.co.uk for any queries related to any individual listed building, planning permission related to listed buildings or the listing process itself.

British Listed Buildings is a Good Stuff website.