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Baxters Farmhouse

A Grade II Listed Building in Upottery, Devon

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Coordinates

Latitude: 50.8721 / 50°52'19"N

Longitude: -3.1292 / 3°7'45"W

OS Eastings: 320642

OS Northings: 108677

OS Grid: ST206086

Mapcode National: GBR M0.T735

Mapcode Global: FRA 46BS.NQT

Entry Name: Baxters Farmhouse

Listing Date: 16 March 1988

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1098239

English Heritage Legacy ID: 86645

Location: Upottery, East Devon, Devon, EX14

County: Devon

District: East Devon

Civil Parish: Upottery

Traditional County: Devon

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Devon

Church of England Parish: Upottery St Mary the Virgin

Church of England Diocese: Exeter

Find accommodation in
Upottery

Listing Text

UPOTTERY
ST 20 NW
7/91 Baxters Farmhouse
-
- II
Farmhouse. Late C16-early C17, probably earlier origins, refurbished in the late
C19. Local stone and flint rubble; stone rubble stacks, one with a Hamstone ashlar
chimneyshaft, the other 2 topped with C19 brick; partly slate, part corrugated iron
roof, formerly thatch.
Plan: 3-room-and-through-passage plan house facing south-west and built down the
hillslope. Uphill at the left (north-west) end is a parlour with a gable-end stack.
The wide passage is next to it and the other side is the hall with an axial stack
backing onto the passage. Downhill at the right (south-east) end is a kitchen with
a gable-end stack. Very little early carpentry is exposed in the house and
therefore it is not possible to determine the early structural history. What little
that is exposed is late C16 and C17. The house may have begun as some form of open
hall house. It is now 2 storeys.
Exterior: irregular 4-window front of mostly late C19 - early C20 casements with
glazing bars but there is an earlier window, first floor right end, which contains
rectangular panes of leaded glass. The passage front doorway is left of centre and
it contains a late C19 part-glazed plank door behind a contemporary gabled porch.
There is a secondary door into the kitchen at the right end and it too contains a
part-glazed plank door. A straight join shows in the front wall just right of the
passage but it is not known what it represents. The roof is gable-ended and steps
down from the slate section over the hall to the corrugated iron section over the
kitchen.
Interior shows mostly the result of the late C19 refurbishment. For instance, no
beam shows in the parlour and the fireplace is blocked by a C19 grate. The half
beams in the passage and the axial beam in the hall are chamfered with step stops.
The hall fireplace is stone rubble with an oak-framed front with chamfered surround
(the supporting posts have large scantling). The kitchen has a large, probably C17,
fireplace, stone rubble with chamfered oak lintel. The ceiling here was replaced in
the late C19. At this time the farmhouse was occupied by a butcher and this room
was converted to a slaughterhouse. The roofspace is inaccessible and the roof
trusses are boxed into the first floor partitions.
Baxters has been little modernised in the C20. More C16 and C17 features are
probably hidden by C19 plaster and, if the early roof remains it may provide
evidence of the early structural development of the farmhouse.


Listing NGR: ST2064208677

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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