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Clapper Bridge at SX3518165252

A Grade II Listed Building in St. Mellion, Cornwall

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Coordinates

Latitude: 50.4639 / 50°27'49"N

Longitude: -4.3236 / 4°19'25"W

OS Eastings: 235178

OS Northings: 65249

OS Grid: SX351652

Mapcode National: GBR NM.N58H

Mapcode Global: FRA 17TT.RF4

Entry Name: Clapper Bridge at SX3518165252

Listing Date: 23 January 1968

Last Amended: 14 May 2018

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1136855

English Heritage Legacy ID: 61319

Location: Quethiock, Cornwall, PL17

County: Cornwall

Civil Parish: St. Mellion

Traditional County: Cornwall

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Cornwall

Church of England Parish: St Mellion

Church of England Diocese: Truro

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Listing Text

QUETHIOCK

SX 36 NE

8/120

Clapper Bridge at SX3518165252

23.1.68

II

Bridge over River Lynher. Circa early C16 replacing earlier clapper stones. Partly rebuilt, possibly in C19. Stone rubble and moorstone. Three round arches of 2 metres and 3 metres span with dressed stone and granite voussoirs with granite keystones. Cutwaters between, partly of granite, continued up to form angled refuges on west side. Cutwaters on east side partly replaced with buttresses between first and second and second and third arch. C19 fourth span with granite lintel on south. 2.7 metre wide roadway with stone rubble parapets with chamfered granite copings, splayed over abutments.

In 1480 during the War of the Roses, the Lancastrian, Richard Edgcumbe of Cotehele complained that Richard Willoughby, later Lord Broke of Callington, with his retainers 'contrewayted him at Pilyton and at Klaper Brygge so that he might nought pass no care for jupertye of his life' called Clayper Bridge by Norden in 1584.

This entry was subject to a Minor Amendment on 13 September 2017.

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Summary

A Cornish C16 multi-span bridge on the site of an earlier medieval clapper bridge, partly rebuilt and adapted in the C19 and later.

Description

A C16 multi-span bridge over the River Lynher, possibly incorporating the earlier medieval clapper bridge on the site, and partly rebuilt, possibly in the C19.

MATERIALS: stone rubble and moorstone.

PLAN: constructed on a north-east/ south-west orientation across the River Lynher. Elements of the original clapper bridge structure, built from large slabs of stone, may still be contained within and below the structure of the present multi-span bridge.

DESCRIPTION: the bridge has three round arches of 2m and 3m span with dressed stone and granite voussoirs with granite keystones. A string-course highlights the line, called the impost, where each arch springs from the piers and abutments. The imposts and structure below may date to the earlier clapper bridge. The cutwaters between, partly of granite, continued up to form angled refuges on the north-west side. The cutwaters on south-east side are partly replaced with buttresses. There is a fourth span of possible C19 date at the south end, with a granite lintel. The stone rubble parapets have chamfered granite copings with iron cramps, and are splayed over the abutments. A C19 iron plaque to each parapet reads COUNTY OF CORNWALL/ TAKE NOTICE THAT THIS BRIDGE (WHICH/ IS A COUNTY BRIDGE) IS INSUFFICIENT TO/ CARRY WEIGHTS BEYOND THE ORDINARY TRAFFIC/ OF THE DISTRICT AND THAT THE OWNERS/ DRIVERS AND PERSONS IN CHARGE OF/ LOCOMOTIVES ARE WARNED AGAINST/ ATTEMPTING THE PASSAGE OF THE BRIDGE/ WITHOUT THE CONSENT OF THE COUNTY SURVEYOR/ BY ORDER OF THE COUNTY JUSTICES/ SILVANUS W JENKIN/ SURVEYOR.

History

Clapper Bridge was recorded at this location in 1480 when, during the War of the Roses, Richard Edgcumbe of Cotehele complained that Richard Willoughby, later Lord Broke of Callington, with his retainers 'contrewayted him at Pilyton and at Klaper Brygge so that he might nought pass no care for jupertye of his life'. It was called Clayper Bridge by Norden in 1584 and by this time the bridge has probably been rebuilt from its simple clapper stone construction. The bridge was partly rebuilt, possibly in the C19, when an additional flood arch was constructed. There are C19 County plaques installed to the parapet wall by the County Surveyor. The original clapper bridge, built from large slabs of stone, may still be contained within the structure of the present bridge. Later works to the bridge are minor and include the insertion of concrete kerbing to the south roadway and mortar repairs to the parapet wall coping stones.

Reasons for Listing

Clapper Bridge, a C16 multi-span bridge on the site of a medieval clapper bridge, is listed at Grade II, for the following principal reasons:

Historic interest:
* it is a significant example of a C16 multi-span bridge, an uncommon survival both regionally and nationally.

Architectural interest:
* it is a neatly-made structure with well-constructed arches to the spans and cutwaters, retaining its C16 form;
* despite later alterations and repairs, it retains a significant proportion of its C16 fabric and possibly incorporates parts of the medieval clapper bridge. The later rebuilding and elaboration of the bridge demonstrate its continuing importance and add to its interest.

Group value:
* with another nearby Grade II-listed bridge.

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