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Bank House

A Grade II Listed Building in Chester, Cheshire West and Chester

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Coordinates

Latitude: 53.1888 / 53°11'19"N

Longitude: -2.8929 / 2°53'34"W

OS Eastings: 340433

OS Northings: 366113

OS Grid: SJ404661

Mapcode National: GBR 79.35SS

Mapcode Global: WH88F.J3MR

Entry Name: Bank House

Listing Date: 28 July 1955

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1376485

English Heritage Legacy ID: 470486

Location: Cheshire West and Chester, CH1

County: Cheshire West and Chester

Electoral Ward/Division: Chester City

Built-Up Area: Chester

Traditional County: Cheshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Cheshire

Church of England Parish: Chester, St Peter

Church of England Diocese: Chester

Find accommodation in
Hough Green

Listing Text


CHESTER CITY (IM)

SJ4066SW WHITE FRIARS
595-1/3/442 (North side)
28/07/55 No.18
Bank House

GV II

Detached town house, now surgeries. Probably largely mid C18,
altered, with a little possibly medieval stonework. Brown
brick in irregular bond; grey slate roof, largely concealed.
EXTERIOR: 3 storeys, of 2 or more builds. The front to White
Friars has a staggered vertical joint near the centre, and
irregular fenestration. Door of 2 flush panels, 2 fielded
panels and 2 panels now glazed in a timber case with roses in
corners of frieze; a later lattice porch of wood; 3 nearly
flush horned sashes with painted stone sills just above ground
level and slightly cambered gauged brick arches west of door,
one of 12 panes and 2 now 4 panes; a sash of 16-panes east of
the door. The west part of the second storey has 3 recessed
12-pane sashes; the east part has a tall 10 x 3 pane stair
window and a flush 12-pane sash. The third storey has 2
recessed 16-pane sashes, west, and a flush 12-pane sash east.
Parapet with plain stone coping; gable chimneys. The east side
has a door now part-glazed, a replaced second storey window
and a projecting stack. The south 2m of the east face are
slightly recessed.
The north face has 3 gables; the intersections suggest that
the central gable was built first, probably the north wing of
an L-shaped house whose west wing would have coincided with
the central portion of the present west front; note the
chimney at the internal corner of the 2 suggested wings, and a
portion of probably medieval stonework near the centre of the
first storey, north. The first storey has a sandstone plinth,
an altered door in a lattice porch similar to that to front
and miscellaneous fenestration; the second storey has a flush
tripartite sash of 4;12;4 panes in east wing, a central nearly
flush 12-pane sash and a similar sash, set towards the centre,
in the west wing; the third storey has a central 16-pane flush
sash in each of the 3 gable-ends. The north face may at one
period have formed an almost symmetrical front to the house.
INTERIOR: the surgeries could not be inspected. The
south-west, now waiting room, has panelled embrasures, 6-panel
doors with carved lions-heads at corners of architraves and a
panelled plaster ceiling, formerly to more than one room. The
former kitchen, northeast, has a blocked range-opening and a
former alcove. The open-well newel stair, evidently C18, has


balustrade covered.
NOTE: c.f. the stonework in the north face of Bank House with
the sandstone portion of its garden wall to No.16 White Friars
(qv).

Listing NGR: SJ4043366113

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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