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Church of St Luke

A Grade II* Listed Building in Weaste and Seedley, Salford

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Coordinates

Latitude: 53.4839 / 53°29'2"N

Longitude: -2.3026 / 2°18'9"W

OS Eastings: 380013

OS Northings: 398621

OS Grid: SJ800986

Mapcode National: GBR D4G.43

Mapcode Global: WH989.LPQJ

Entry Name: Church of St Luke

Listing Date: 18 January 1980

Grade: II*

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1386145

English Heritage Legacy ID: 471569

Location: Salford, M6

County: Salford

Electoral Ward/Division: Weaste and Seedley

Built-Up Area: Salford

Traditional County: Lancashire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Greater Manchester

Church of England Parish: Weaste, Seedley and Langworthy

Church of England Diocese: Manchester

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Listing Text


SALFORD

SJ89NW LIVERPOOL STREET
949-1/4/70 (South side)
18/01/80 Church of St Luke

II*

Parish church. 1865, the chancel chapel added 1875. By George
Gilbert Scott. Coursed sandstone rubble with plain-tiled roof.
Gothic style with nave with clerestory and aisles.
EXTERIOR: lower chancel with semicircular apse and attached
chapels to N and S with parallel ridges and end gables.
Projecting gabled porch to N. Slim tower over W end with angle
buttresses and bell chamber lights with paired lancets. Brooch
spire above with lucarnes. Nave of 4 bays, with paired lancets
to aisles with foiled circular windows to clerestory. Paired
lancets between buttresses to apse, and similar to side
chapels but with plate tracery. Stone plinth with continuous
sill-band.
INTERIOR: quatrefoil piers to arcade, and apse with arcading
alternating stained glass windows by Kempe and painted panels
over panelled dado. East window possibly by Hardman. Tower
supported internally by large circular columns with carved
capitals.
(The Buildings of England: Pevsner N: South Lancashire:
Harmondsworth: 1969-: 395).


Listing NGR: SJ8001398621

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Description


SALFORD

SJ89NW LIVERPOOL STREET
949-1/4/70 (South side)
18/01/80 Church of St Luke

II*

Parish church. 1865, the chancel chapel added 1875. By George
Gilbert Scott. Coursed sandstone rubble with plain-tiled roof.
Gothic style with nave with clerestory and aisles.
EXTERIOR: lower chancel with semicircular apse and attached
chapels to N and S with parallel ridges and end gables.
Projecting gabled porch to N. Slim tower over W end with angle
buttresses and bell chamber lights with paired lancets. Brooch
spire above with lucarnes. Nave of 4 bays, with paired lancets
to aisles with foiled circular windows to clerestory. Paired
lancets between buttresses to apse, and similar to side
chapels but with plate tracery. Stone plinth with continuous
sill-band.
INTERIOR: quatrefoil piers to arcade, and apse with arcading
alternating stained glass windows by Kempe and painted panels
over panelled dado. East window possibly by Hardman. Tower
supported internally by large circular columns with carved
capitals.
(The Buildings of England: Pevsner N: South Lancashire:
Harmondsworth: 1969-: 395).


Listing NGR: SJ8001398621

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