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Church of The Holy Trinity

A Grade II Listed Building in Malvern, Worcestershire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 52.1198 / 52°7'11"N

Longitude: -2.3302 / 2°19'48"W

OS Eastings: 377485

OS Northings: 246878

OS Grid: SO774468

Mapcode National: GBR 0FM.5N4

Mapcode Global: VH92Y.KZGC

Plus Code: 9C4V4M99+WW

Entry Name: Church of The Holy Trinity

Listing Date: 3 April 2008

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1392674

English Heritage Legacy ID: 503249

Location: Malvern, Malvern Hills, Worcestershire, WR14

County: Worcestershire

District: Malvern Hills

Civil Parish: Malvern

Built-Up Area: Great Malvern

Traditional County: Worcestershire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Worcestershire

Church of England Parish: Malvern The Holy Trinity

Church of England Diocese: Worcester

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Description

943/0/10058

MALVERN
Link Top
WORCESTER ROAD
Church of The Holy Trinity

03-APR-08

II
Church of 1850-51 by Samuel Dawkes of Cheltenham and 1872 by George and Henry Haddon with later additions and alterations of 1896-7 and 1908-9 by William Henman.

MATERIALS: Rubble stone with ashlar dressings and a plain tiled roof. Gothic.

PLAN: Nave with aisles and chancel, south-west porch, north east vestry and organ loft and north-east octagonal tower.

EXTERIOR: The south aisle has a lower ridge than that to the north. Both have paired lancets with cusped heads, between which are offset buttresses. The clerestorys have, alternating, small trefoil lights at eaves level (which are of the original form designed by Dawkes), or triple lancets set in gabled dormers with trefoils to their heads (later alterations by William Henman of 1896-7). The south-west porch is gabled with lateral buttresses and a hood mould. The gabled west end has a central door which projects beneath a gabled canopy with offset buttresses at either side. These die back to a string course below the twin lancets which rise for the full height of the wall and extend into the gable. To the head of the gable is a quatrefoil with crosses to the cusps and at the apex is a further quatrefoil. The south aisle has a two-light window with plate tracery and the north aisle has a three-light window with Decorated tracery. The vestry, which projects to the north, has three stepped lancets beneath a gable. To its left is the hipped roof of the organ loft and to left again is the square base of the tower, which dies via broaches to an octagonal upper body. It has two-light openings to the top and a candle-snuffer, tiled roof.

INTERIOR: The nave has arcades of five bays to each side with small arches at the far west end. The arches have two chamfered reveals with a continuous hood mould. Above these carved angle corbels support the wall posts which support the relatively simple roof, which has arched braces and ties. The chancel has a three-light window to the east with Decorated tracery and stained glass by Charles Eamer Kempe of 1902. There are two two-light windows to the south side and one to the north and a priest's door to the north. The organ projects into the chancel space and also the north aisle. It has stencilled pipes, and the walls and panelled ceiling of the chancel are also richly decorated with stencils showing music-making angels, holy initials and instruments of the passion etc by W.Forsyth of 1901. The reredos has a series of trefoil-headed panels decorated with mosaic images of saints. The pews, pulpit and stalls were all fitted by William Henman in 1908-9 and appear unaltered.

HISTORY: The main body of the church; nave, chancel, north and south aisles and vestry, was built in 1850-51 by Samuel Dawkes of Cheltenham. A print in the church vestry shows that the north aisle formerly had a north-western porch. However, this aisle was widened in 1872 by George and Henry Haddon and the church was further altered in 1896-7 by William Henman who added the north vestry and organ chamber and widened the chancel arch and added the gabled clerestory windows to the nave. In 1908-09 Henman also renewed most of the fittings, including pews, pulpit and stalls and the chancel was stencilled by W.Forsyth in 1901. The east window by Kempe, is of 1902.

SOURCES: Nikolaus Pevsner, Buildings of England, Worcestershire, 1968; Tim Bridges, Churches of Worcestershire, 2005; Alan Brooks and Nikolaus Pevsner, Buildings of England, Worcestershire (revised edition, typescript), 2007.

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION DECISION: The Church of The Holy Trinity, Malvern Link is designated at Grade II for the following principal reasons:
* It is a balanced and well-considered design to which sensitive additions have been made.
* It has distinct architectural quality and was principally designed by a respected Victorian architect.
* The building is largely intact and includes furnishing of good quality and a sumptuously-decorated chancel.
* It is a local landmark and provides a significant contribution to the built texture of this part of Malvern.

Reasons for Listing

* It is a balanced and well-considered design to which sensitive addtions have been made.
* It has distinct architectural quality and was principally designed by a respected Victorian architect.
* The building is largely intact and includes furnishing of good quality and a sumptuously-decorated chancel.
* It is a local landmark and provides a significant contribution to the built texture of this part of Malvern.

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