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36, Slater Street

A Grade II Listed Building in Riverside, Liverpool

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Coordinates

Latitude: 53.402 / 53°24'7"N

Longitude: -2.9804 / 2°58'49"W

OS Eastings: 334911

OS Northings: 389917

OS Grid: SJ349899

Mapcode National: GBR 75Q.8G

Mapcode Global: WH877.6R09

Entry Name: 36, Slater Street

Listing Date: 29 October 2008

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1393094

English Heritage Legacy ID: 504278

Location: Liverpool, L1

County: Liverpool

Electoral Ward/Division: Riverside

Built-Up Area: Liverpool

Traditional County: Lancashire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Merseyside

Church of England Parish: Liverpool Our Lady and St Nicholas

Church of England Diocese: Liverpool

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Listing Text


392/0/10322 SLATER STREET
29-OCT-08 36

II
Terrace house. Late C18 or early C19. Brick with stone dressings, slate roof.

PLAN: Double-depth, two-room layout with staircase against left (S) party wall beyond entrance passage, fireplaces against right (N) party wall, full-height rear bay window and rear service wing (outrigger).

EXTERIOR: Built in Flemish bond. Three storeys high with a basement and two bays wide. Round-headed recessed doorway to the extreme left-hand (S) side. Six fielded-panel door raised up four stone steps and set in a classical door-case with a semi-circular overlight above. To right are two large sash windows, set off centre, with basement windows below. On first floor are two centrally-placed sash windows of same height as those on ground floor, with half-height second-floor windows above. All windows have stone wedge lintels, with stone sills except for the basement windows (which are boarded over). The other windows have replacement sash frames with one-over-one panes. Simple moulded stone eaves cornice. North gable stack to either side of ridge.

INTERIOR: Entrance passage with shallow moulded cornice and front room with deep cavetto cornice, with dividing wall removed. Later angled entrance lobby incorporating late C19 stained-glass flower panels. To rear of entrance passage is doorway through to stair hall, with original architrave and semi-circular overlight. Rear ground-floor room (divided into separate spaces by partition dividers) with moulded cornice, and replacement bay window frame with French doors. At rear of stair hall is the service wing with two ground-floor rooms. Stair hall contains a timber open-well, open-string staircase rising from the ground floor to the second floor with quarter landings. Turned newel, swept mahogany handrail and two stick balusters to each tread. Unadorned tread ends.
Round-headed doorway (blocked) on first quarter landing through to first floor of service wing. Door case has panelled pilasters similar to those either side of adjacent stair window. Inserted doorway and steps next to blocked doorway. First-floor front room has a moulded cornice, original window architraves and panelled splayed shutter boxes, and a reeded mantelpiece with corner roundels. The first-floor rear room has a bow window with original architrave, panelled splayed sash boxes, and tripartite panelling beneath the window. Later C19 window frame with stained-glass upper lights. Inbuilt cupboards and drawers to right of chimneybreast, which are respected by the cornice. Modern toilets in first floor of service wing and passageway leading through to later C19 mews building to rear.
The two second-floor rooms have moulded cornices, that to rear room very simple, and fireplaces with moulded mantelpieces. The front room fireplace retains its grate, whilst that to the rear room is boarded over. To the right of the rear room chimneybreast is a cupboard and drawers set in an architrave. Two rooms on the second floor of the service wing.
There is a large basement with several rooms.

HISTORY: The neighbourhood in which Slater Street lies is on the east side of Canning Place, the site of Liverpool's first enclosed dock, and was developed between the mid C18 and early C19. A mixture of building types were built, with affluent housing standing alongside industries associated with the port such as ropewalks, timber yards, cooperages and foundries.
No. 36 Slater Street is the one of a terrace of four houses built on the west side of Slater Street. Straight joints show that the houses within the terrace were all built individually, but the whole block is shown on R Horwood's map of 1803, suggesting a late C18 or very early C19 date for their construction.

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION
No.36 Slater Street is designated at Grade II for the following principal reasons:
* It is a relatively complete example of a modest merchant's house of the late C18 or early C19
* It retains its original internal arrangements with contemporary rear service wing and full-height rear bay window
* It retains its original staircase running from the ground floor to the second floor, mantelpieces including the principal drawing room mantelpiece, architraves, and some original hung-sash window frames, particularly a tall, round-headed stair window and a tripartite window in the service wing
* As a modest merchant's house it is an important component of the various domestic and industrial building types which combined to characterise this early urban neighbourhood which developed between the mid C18 and early C19 driven by the trade of the nearby enclosed dock, the first in Liverpool.

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Description


392/0/10322 SLATER STREET
29-OCT-08 36

II
Terrace house. Late C18 or early C19. Brick with stone dressings, slate roof.

PLAN: Double-depth, two-room layout with staircase against left (S) party wall beyond entrance passage, fireplaces against right (N) party wall, full-height rear bay window and rear service wing (outrigger).

EXTERIOR: Built in Flemish bond. Three storeys high with a basement and two bays wide. Round-headed recessed doorway to the extreme left-hand (S) side. Six fielded-panel door raised up four stone steps and set in a classical door-case with a semi-circular overlight above. To right are two large sash windows, set off centre, with basement windows below. On first floor are two centrally-placed sash windows of same height as those on ground floor, with half-height second-floor windows above. All windows have stone wedge lintels, with stone sills except for the basement windows (which are boarded over). The other windows have replacement sash frames with one-over-one panes. Simple moulded stone eaves cornice. North gable stack to either side of ridge.

INTERIOR: Entrance passage with shallow moulded cornice and front room with deep cavetto cornice, with dividing wall removed. Later angled entrance lobby incorporating late C19 stained-glass flower panels. To rear of entrance passage is doorway through to stair hall, with original architrave and semi-circular overlight. Rear ground-floor room (divided into separate spaces by partition dividers) with moulded cornice, and replacement bay window frame with French doors. At rear of stair hall is the service wing with two ground-floor rooms. Stair hall contains a timber open-well, open-string staircase rising from the ground floor to the second floor with quarter landings. Turned newel, swept mahogany handrail and two stick balusters to each tread. Unadorned tread ends.
Round-headed doorway (blocked) on first quarter landing through to first floor of service wing. Door case has panelled pilasters similar to those either side of adjacent stair window. Inserted doorway and steps next to blocked doorway. First-floor front room has a moulded cornice, original window architraves and panelled splayed shutter boxes, and a reeded mantelpiece with corner roundels. The first-floor rear room has a bow window with original architrave, panelled splayed sash boxes, and tripartite panelling beneath the window. Later C19 window frame with stained-glass upper lights. Inbuilt cupboards and drawers to right of chimneybreast, which are respected by the cornice. Modern toilets in first floor of service wing and passageway leading through to later C19 mews building to rear.
The two second-floor rooms have moulded cornices, that to rear room very simple, and fireplaces with moulded mantelpieces. The front room fireplace retains its grate, whilst that to the rear room is boarded over. To the right of the rear room chimneybreast is a cupboard and drawers set in an architrave. Two rooms on the second floor of the service wing.
There is a large basement with several rooms.

HISTORY: The neighbourhood in which Slater Street lies is on the east side of Canning Place, the site of Liverpool's first enclosed dock, and was developed between the mid C18 and early C19. A mixture of building types were built, with affluent housing standing alongside industries associated with the port such as ropewalks, timber yards, cooperages and foundries.
No. 36 Slater Street is the one of a terrace of four houses built on the west side of Slater Street. Straight joints show that the houses within the terrace were all built individually, but the whole block is shown on R Horwood's map of 1803, suggesting a late C18 or very early C19 date for their construction.

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION
No.36 Slater Street is designated at Grade II for the following principal reasons:
* It is a relatively complete example of a modest merchant's house of the late C18 or early C19
* It retains its original internal arrangements with contemporary rear service wing and full-height rear bay window
* It retains its original staircase running from the ground floor to the second floor, mantelpieces including the principal drawing room mantelpiece, architraves, and some original hung-sash window frames, particularly a tall, round-headed stair window and a tripartite window in the service wing
* As a modest merchant's house it is an important component of the various domestic and industrial building types which combined to characterise this early urban neighbourhood which developed between the mid C18 and early C19 driven by the trade of the nearby enclosed dock, the first in Liverpool.

Reasons for Listing

No.36 Slater Street is designated at Grade II for the following principal reasons:
* It is a relatively complete example of a modest merchant's house of the late C18 or early C19
* It retains its original internal arrangements with contemporary rear service wing and full-height rear bay window
* It retains its original staircase running from the ground floor to the second floor, mantelpieces including the principal drawing room mantelpiece, architraves, and some original hung-sash window frames, particularly a tall, round-headed stair window and a tripartite window in the service wing
* As a modest merchant's house it is an important component of the various domestic and industrial building types which combined to characterise this early urban neighbourhood which developed between the mid C18 and early C19 driven by the trade of the nearby enclosed dock, the first in Liverpool.

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