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22, Weymouth Street

A Grade II Listed Building in City of Westminster, London

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.5209 / 51°31'15"N

Longitude: -0.1463 / 0°8'46"W

OS Eastings: 528704

OS Northings: 181854

OS Grid: TQ287818

Mapcode National: GBR C8.BY

Mapcode Global: VHGQZ.F10C

Entry Name: 22, Weymouth Street

Listing Date: 5 June 2009

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1393317

English Heritage Legacy ID: 506120

Location: Westminster, London, W1G

County: London

District: City of Westminster

Electoral Ward/Division: Marylebone High Street

Built-Up Area: City of Westminster

Traditional County: Middlesex

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Greater London

Church of England Parish: St Marylebone

Church of England Diocese: London

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Listing Text


1900/1/10438 WEYMOUTH STREET
05-JUN-09 (North side)
22

II
House. 1934. Designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott in conjunction with his brother Adrian Gilbert Scott, built by Bovis Ltd (date stone on front elevation).

MATERIALS: Ground floor constructed in reinforced concrete; upper floors of timber joists. Faced in red and plum hand-made bricks laid in variant of English garden wall bond; stone dressings; pantile roof.

PLAN: Rectangular plan, comprising central entrance hall with drawing room to right (E) and former library and dining room to left. Main stair to rear of hall. Stair to basement in SW corner of hall is modern insertion.

EXTERIOR: Restrained classical style with neo-Grec detail. Two storeys. Symmetrical front (S) elevation of 6 bays (2-3-2) to ground floor with central section breaking forward, with the central entrance bay again slightly set forward; this has a recessed porch with stone steps; flanked by windows. Entrance has reeded architrave. The central portion of the first floor breaks forward only slightly, and comprises a loggia, with two windows behind; this is flanked by two windows on each side. Soldier course bands continuing across window heads. Stacks with stepped-back parapets. Georgian-style timber sash windows; those to outer four ground-floor bays and recessed balcony tripartite. Entrance steps flanked by stone planters. Hipped roof to front and sides conceals flat-roof terrace to rear.

Rear elevation in Devonshire Close is visible for only part of building's width. Recessed porch to left with 2 sash windows, those to ground floor tripartite. Soldier course banded detailing similar to front elevation.

INTERIOR: Hall has stone floor; shallow architraves and skirtings in artificial 'San Stefano' stone. Doors are 3-panelled in an archaic Greek manner. Drawing room has timber pilastered architrave to double doors. The hall and ground floor rooms have shallow-stepped moulded cornices, with reeded banding beneath in the hall, but some cornices appear to have been further embellished at a later stage. There are several late-C18 marble neo-classical chimneypieces which were installed when the house was built. Two curved steps lead up to the main stair, which has solid lower balustrade with wrought-iron scrolled upper balustrade; handrail replaced. Skylight above. The first floor rooms and basement are more altered but retain some cornices and panelled doors.

HISTORY: The house was built in 1934 to the design of Sir Giles Gilbert Scott in conjunction with his younger brother Adrian Gilbert Scott. Giles Gilbert Scott (1880-1960) was one of the most important of C20 British architects; his many celebrated commissions include the Anglican cathedral of Liverpool and Battersea Power Station, as well as the K6 telephone kiosk. Scott designed relatively few private houses: Greystones, Hendon (1907, in conjunction with Adrian); Grey Wings, Leatherhead (1913); Chester House, Marylebone, his own residence (1925-6), all Grade II, and 22 Weymouth Street.

SOURCES: Architect & Building News, 30 November 1934

REASON FOR DESIGNATION: 22 Weymouth Street is designated for the following principal reasons:

* Of special architectural interest as one of a very small and distinguished portfolio of private houses by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, a major figure in C20 architecture, designed in conjuntion with his brother Adrian Gilbert Scott. It demonstrates par excellence the architect's personal manner of combining modernist form with traditional detail, and is virtually intact externally. The high-quality brickwork, the hallmark of Scott's work, with subtle detailing demonstrate his advocacy of 'contrast between plain surfaces and sparse well-placed ornament just where it is needed and nowhere else'.

* The interior complements this restrained classical aesthetic, and retains a significant proportion of its original plan and fittings on the principal floor.

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Reasons for Listing

22 Weymouth Street has been designated for the following principal reasons:

* Of special architectural interest as one of a very small and distinguished portfolio of private houses by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, a major figure in C20 architecture;
* It demonstrates par excellence the architect's personal manner of combining modernist form with traditional detail, and is virtually intact externally;
* The high-quality brickwork, the hallmark of Scott's work, with subtle detailing demonstrates his advocacy of 'contrast between plain surfaces and sparse well-placed ornament just where it is needed and nowhere else';
* The interior complements this restrained classical aesthetic, and retains a significant proportion of its original plan and features on the principal floor.

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