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Cow House, Aqualate Hall

A Grade II Listed Building in Forton, Staffordshire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 52.7746 / 52°46'28"N

Longitude: -2.3355 / 2°20'7"W

OS Eastings: 377463

OS Northings: 319719

OS Grid: SJ774197

Mapcode National: GBR 05P.4B3

Mapcode Global: WH9CS.3J49

Entry Name: Cow House, Aqualate Hall

Listing Date: 15 October 2009

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1393493

English Heritage Legacy ID: 506772

Location: Forton, Stafford, Staffordshire, TF10

County: Staffordshire

District: Stafford

Civil Parish: Forton

Traditional County: Staffordshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Staffordshire

Church of England Parish: Forton All Saints

Church of England Diocese: Lichfield

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Listing Text

FORTON

603/0/10057 Cow House, Aqualate Hall
15-OCT-09

GV II
A cow house on the Aqualate Hall estate, dating from c. 1800.

MATERIALS: Red brick with a red clay tile roof.

PLAN: The building is rectangular on plan, originally built as part of a longer range, now detached.

EXTERIOR: The cow house is a two-storey, red-brick building with a hipped, red tile roof. In the east wall (originally giving access outward from the farm courtyard) there are three doors, and in the west wall, four. Light and ventilation comes via narrow slit-like windows with stone sills, set level with the door tops, and via two larger windows in the rebuilt north wall. The upper floor of the east and west walls have seven, square, fairly equally spaced 'windows'. To the east the second, fourth and sixth are open, to allow fodder and bedding to be loaded in to what is a boarded attic storeroom. The others are blind, with recessed panels of brickwork pierced by large, lozenge-shaped ventilation panels. All seven of the 'windows' on the west side take this latter form.

INTERIOR: Internally, the cow house is of three relatively large bays. That to the south has a pair of stalls, whilst in the central and northern bays there are three stalls each, facing the dividing panel. In all, this would have accommodated eight pairs of animals. Upstairs, the loft, reach by a vertical ladder and trapdoor, is a single open space. The king-post roof has double banks of staggered butt purlins.

HISTORY: The history of this particular structure is not documented, but on architectural grounds, a date of c. 1800 is likely. The cow house is now a detached building, standing between the Grade II listed stables complex to the west and the walled kitchen garden to the east. On the first edition Ordnance Survey map of 1879 it is clear that, when built, the cow house formed the southern end of a north-south range, which was part of a farm courtyard which lay against the stables complex. This range was later truncated, probably soon after 1879, when what had been an internal wall was reworked to form the new north, gable-end, wall of the cow house, and the north end of the roof was provided with a hip to match that at its south end.

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION: The cow house at Aqualate Hall is designated at Grade II, for the following principal reasons:
* As a large, substantial and well-detailed cow house of c. 1800, possibly built to house parkland cattle
* Although it has been altered - what is now a free-standing building was once the end of a longer range - the cow house is otherwise little changed, and retains internal fittings including stalls
* As part of an unusually full and architecturally interesting set of estate buildings, including Grade II listed stables to one side of Aqualate Hall, itself listed at Grade II*.

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Reasons for Listing

The cow house at Aqualate Hall is designated at Grade II, for the following principal reasons:
* As a large, substantial and well-detailed cow house of c. 1800, possibly built to house parkland cattle
* Although it has been altered - what is now a free-standing building was once the end of a longer range - the cow house is otherwise little changed, and retains internal fittings including stalls
* As part of an unusually full and architecturally interesting set of estate buildings, including Grade II listed stables to one side of Aqualate Hall, itself listed at Grade II*.

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