History in Structure

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Pied House

A Grade II Listed Building in Berriew, Powys

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Coordinates

Latitude: 52.5818 / 52°34'54"N

Longitude: -3.2066 / 3°12'23"W

OS Eastings: 318340

OS Northings: 298899

OS Grid: SO183988

Mapcode National: GBR 9X.BK5R

Mapcode Global: WH7B1.QC7L

Entry Name: Pied House

Listing Date: 21 August 1995

Last Amended: 21 August 1995

Grade: II

Source: Cadw

Source ID: 16382

Building Class: Domestic

Location: Prominently sited above the Llifior Brook, overlooking the Severn valley, and approached via a by-road which leaves the main A483 1km approx. S of Garthmyl.

County: Powys

Community: Berriew (Aberriw)

Community: Berriew

Locality: Garthmyl

Traditional County: Montgomeryshire

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Berriew

History

The house has been built and remodelled in a number of distinct phases: its 2 parallel gabled ranges appear to be contemporary or near-contemporary in origin, and are probably late C16-early C17: there is some evidence to suggest that the northern range was partially rebuilt shortly afterwards (perhaps late C17), and it was also subsequently raised in height. The southern range was also partially rebuilt and raised in height, probably in the C19.

Exterior

The house comprises 2 parallel downhill sited ranges. Timber framed, the original box framing is exposed in the two up-hill gables: large square panels with queen post and collar strut roofs. Graded slate roofs. Northern range retains exposed timber framing in its front (N-facing) wall, but this does not all appear to be of the same phase as the gable, and the evidence suggests that the front wall of the uphill unit may have been rebuilt at some time. Both phases of framing in this front wall are square panels with middle and intermediate rails, with painted brick and some plaster panel infill. The roof-line has been raised, and there is a third phase of framing above the original wall-plate. Entrance to right of centre in added gabled porch; 4-light casement windows of mid C19 type, with bracketed hoods. Smaller casement windows in the uphill unit. Lower gable wall is well coursed and squared stone, painted, and shows clear evidence of being raised in height; stone stack, itself raised in brick. Southern parallel range appears to have been more extensively rebuilt during the C19, although it is likely that the original construction may have been incorporated. Lower gable end wall is plaster (apparently over brick), painted in imitation of timber framing. Doorway to right of this gable, a battened plank door with leaded overlight, and bracketed timber hood. 3-light windows alongside it; fenestration in return elevation of this wing renewed. Brick stack added to this wall towards the right. Former dairy and apple store built against the uphill gable of this range.

Interior

Northern range retains its 2-unit plan, with stop-chamfered axial beam and massive fireplace in the lower gable of principal room, and timber-framed partition wall between the two units. Probably similar original layout of southern range altered (as part of the C19 rebuilding), to accommodate an entrance hall and staircase: the paired beams in the principal room on each floor survive, plastered over to ground floor, but retaining chamfer with ornate stop to first floor.

Reasons for Listing

Included as a large vernacular farmhouse exhibiting a typical development pattern in its successive phases of construction, and retaining much of its early character.

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