History in Structure

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The Barn

A Grade II Listed Building in Bicton, Devon

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Coordinates

Latitude: 50.6643 / 50°39'51"N

Longitude: -3.3441 / 3°20'38"W

OS Eastings: 305099

OS Northings: 85821

OS Grid: SY050858

Mapcode National: GBR P6.1VWJ

Mapcode Global: FRA 37WB.308

Entry Name: The Barn

Listing Date: 10 February 1987

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1097556

English Heritage Legacy ID: 86225

Location: Bicton, East Devon, Devon, EX9

County: Devon

District: East Devon

Civil Parish: Bicton

Traditional County: Devon

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Devon

Church of England Parish: East Budleigh All Saints

Church of England Diocese: Exeter

Find accommodation in
East Budleigh

Listing Text

BICTON YETTINGTON
SY 08 NE
3/24 The Barn
-
- II
House, former farmhouse and adjoining stables. Mid C16, altered in the C17 and C19.
Plastered cob on stone rubble footings, some repairs in brick and stone rubble; one
stone rubble stack with a late C19 chimney shaft topped by a contemporary Rolle
Estate chimney pot, another C20 brick stack; thatch roof.
L-shaped building with the main block facing west and having a 3-room plan. The
largest room at the right (southern) end has a large projecting front lateral stack.
The small middle room has an inserted C20 axial stack. The C17 and C19 alterations
have combined to make an interpretation of the original layout impossible at present.
On the left (northern) end the C17 stable block projects forward. The house is 2
storeys.
Irregular 2-window front between the projecting stack and stable block. The windows
are late C18-early C19 oak-framed casements containing rectangular panes of thin
leaded glass. The first floor windows extend a short distance into the eaves.
Central doorway contains a C20 plank door. The stack contains a small fire window.
The inner side of the stable contains a central late C19-early C20 plank door flanked
by an unglazed C19 window frame and a C20 fixed pane window. The main roof is
gable-ended to right and hipped to left and is higher to right than left. The stable
is even lower and gable-ended. The rear elevation has C20 casements with glazing
bars to the ground floor but has some more late C18-early C19 oak-framed casements
with leaded glass to the first floor.
Interior: in the large right end room the crossbeam is boxed in and the fireplace is
blocked. Only in the left end room does structural carpentry show, a late C16-early
C17 soffit-chamfered and step stopped crossbeam. The lower left end section of the
roof is also early. The 3-bay section has 2 side-pegged jointed cruck trusses. They
are very dark which may be smoke-blackening from an original open hearth fire. The
taller right end section is inaccessible although the feet of the principals suggest
a C17 A-frame truss here. The stable block still has a pitched cobble floor and is
open to the C17 roof which is carried on 2 A-frame trusses with pegged lap-jointed
collars.
At present it is very difficult to interpret the development of this farmhouse.
Care should be taken during any modernisation work lest C16 or C17 features be
disturbed.


Listing NGR: SY0509985821

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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