History in Structure

This site is entirely user-supported. See how you can help.

Silver House

A Grade II Listed Building in Chulmleigh, Devon

We don't have any photos of this building yet. Why don't you be the first to send us one?

Upload Photo »

Approximate Location Map
Large Map »

Coordinates

Latitude: 50.9128 / 50°54'46"N

Longitude: -3.8673 / 3°52'2"W

OS Eastings: 268824

OS Northings: 114256

OS Grid: SS688142

Mapcode National: GBR L0.QS40

Mapcode Global: FRA 26SP.H6C

Entry Name: Silver House

Listing Date: 25 October 1988

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1106709

English Heritage Legacy ID: 97238

Location: Chulmleigh, North Devon, Devon, EX18

County: Devon

District: North Devon

Civil Parish: Chulmleigh

Built-Up Area: Chulmleigh

Traditional County: Devon

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Devon

Church of England Parish: Chulmleigh St Mary Magdalene

Church of England Diocese: Exeter

Find accommodation in
Chulmleigh

Listing Text

CHULMLEIGH EAST STREET, (south side),
SS 6814 -6914
Chulmleigh
7/60 Silver House
GV II
House. Early C16, remodelled in early C17, refenestrated in C19, and undergoing
alterations at time of survey (June 1986). Painted roughcast rendered stone rubble
and cob. Thatch roof, asbestos slate roof to rear, gable end to left and hipped at
right end. Tall front lateral stone rubble hall stack with tapered cap and stone
rubble stack at left end shared with Beggars Roost (q.v.). Corrugated iron roofs to
rear ranges.
Plan: 2 room and through-passage plan, lower end to left with single storey, rear
service ranges to each end, creating overall U-shaped plan.
Originally a open hall house with hall to right of screens passage and lower end to
left. The smoke-blackening extends from end to end of the front range. To judge by
the similar hollow chamfered bressumers at each end of the building, the lower end
and hall were floored and hall stack inserted at the same period, but the lower gable
end stack is a late C17 insertion. The lower end therefore appears to have been
converted at this period from a buttery and cellar (there being 2 doorways to the
screen on the lower side of the passage) to a parlour. In the late C18 or early C19,
a hip was introduced at the right end, and it is not therefore clear whether the
house may have originally extended beyond the hall to the right. Probably at the
same time a single storey gable-ended rear with 2 small service rooms to rear right
end and a stair outshut to the rear of the lower end which was later enclosed by a
lean-to roof over the rear outbuilding which extends at right angles to the rear left
end. In the early C20, the through-passage was modified by removing the screen-on
the hall side and inserting a stud partition encroaching further into the hall, a
winder staircase replacing the original to the rear right side of the passage.
Exterior: 2 storeys. 3 window range. Early to mid C19 fenestration entirely
intact, all hornless 12 paned sashes. Ground floor has similar sashes to left of
plank door and at right end, the 2 storey hall bay having been built out in line with
the lateral stack. C19 3 light casement 2 panes per light to upper storey of main
range at rear and similar 4 light casement 3 panes per light to courtyard face of
right-hand rear service range.
Interior: lower end has hollow chamfered bressumer to the gable end, the heavy
square-cut axial joists supported entirely by this and the plank and muntin screen on
the lower side of the passage. The stack is clearly a late C17 insertion and has a
chamfered timber lintel with small hollow step and large bar stops. There is no
bread oven. Plank and muntin screen, concealed on passage side, has as seen from
lower side, chamfered muntins, 3 planks wide to right of 2 4-centred arched doorways,
the left-hand doorway blocked at an early date probably when the stack was inserted,
the right-hand doorway modified slightly in C19 with the insertion of a straight-
headed doorway. The wider bay at the left end is comparable to that at Bolberry
Cottage, South Molton Street (q.v), it is wide enough for a third doorway, and the
headrail here is unchamfered; it may therefore have given access to the staircase in
the through-passage. Only the upper treads of the inserted staircase in the rear
outshot at the left-hand corner of the lower end survive. The outbuilding beyond has
a cobbled floor. The front and rear through-passage doorways show clear evidence of
having been reduced in width, the front section of the headrail to the screen on the
hall-side of the passage indicating its former considerable width. Between the
screens is a cross ceiling beam, hollow chamfered on the lower side only. Hall
fireplace has large but unchamfered timber lintel, and a small bread oven in the
left-hand jamb. Hollow-chamfered bressumer at upper end of hall, finishing short at
the front end where the hall bay has been built out. C19 grate to chamber over lower
end.
Roof: 2 cruck trusses, raised and possibly originally jointed, 1 sited forward of the
former screen over the hall, the other situated over the lower side of the through-
passage, and originally fully closed, but now to collar level only. 2 tiers of butt
purlins and diagonally threaded ridge purlins. The third truss close to the left
gable end has straight principals of lighter scantling and the purlins are trenched
rather than threaded. However, all the roof members including battens and rafters
(but not the underside of the thatch) are smoke-blackened, except at right end where
a hip has been introduced. The lower gable end wall also appears to show evidence of
smoke-blackening.


Listing NGR: SS6882414256

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Recommended Books

Other nearby listed buildings

BritishListedBuildings.co.uk is an independent online resource and is not associated with any government department. All government data published here is used under licence. Please do not contact BritishListedBuildings.co.uk for any queries related to any individual listed building, planning permission related to listed buildings or the listing process itself.

British Listed Buildings is a Good Stuff website.