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Parish Church of St Mary

A Grade I Listed Building in Woodditton, Cambridgeshire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 52.2056 / 52°12'20"N

Longitude: 0.4274 / 0°25'38"E

OS Eastings: 565968

OS Northings: 259155

OS Grid: TL659591

Mapcode National: GBR NBC.LX1

Mapcode Global: VHJGQ.CTBJ

Entry Name: Parish Church of St Mary

Listing Date: 19 August 1959

Grade: I

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1164545

English Heritage Legacy ID: 49267

Location: Woodditton, East Cambridgeshire, Cambridgeshire, CB8

County: Cambridgeshire

District: East Cambridgeshire

Civil Parish: Woodditton

Traditional County: Cambridgeshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Cambridgeshire

Church of England Parish: Woodditton St Mary

Church of England Diocese: Ely

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Listing Text

TL 65 NE WOODDITTON WOODDITTON

7/187 Parish Church of St Mary
19.8.59

I

Parish church. Earliest surviving structure early C13, two and
half bays of north arcade, extended later in C13 or early C14.
Chancel and south nave arcade rebuilt in mid C14. Tower and
south porch C15; clerestorey late C15. Restored in 1897-99.
Walls of flint rubble with dressings of clunch and limestone.
Slate and lead roofs. Buttressed tower of four stages, upper
stage octagonal with plain parapet and two-light belfry
windows. Aisles and clerestoreys with embattled parapets,
cornices with fleurons and lion mask gargoyles. South aisle of
four buttressed bays with three trefoiled-light windows in flat
arches. Four clerestorey windows with four-centred arches
linked by moulded impost bands and labels. South porch with C19
embattled parapet. Unbuttressed chancel with two, two-light
windows in flat arches and with coped gable parapet. Interior.
North nave arcade of four bays with three octagonal piers each
with moulded capitals and bases and two centred arches of two
chamfered orders, one pier quatrefoil in plan with moulded
capitals to west. South aisle with continuous moulding to
two-centred arches and half piers with fillets and moulded
capitals and bases. Nave roof C19, king post construction with
some original carved details. Aisle roofs of eight bays C15,
with some timbers restored. Chancel arch without responds.
Chancel screen, C14, with painted panels, partly restored.
Paired niches flank east window, late C14 or C15. Mediaeval
glass in south chancel window. Tower arch C15 has C17 graffiti
of two post windmills, a witch with tall hat, and figure with
mask. Tower screen, iron with brass details possibly French
baroque dated and inscribed 'Petrus Rasorius Oeconomus 1805'.
Set at cill level of C14 east window of north aisle fragments of
alabaster figures from a reredos. South door C15. Porch roof
original with carved bosses at intersections of moulded beams
and two carved angels. Wall paintings in nave below
clerestorey. Poppy-head pews C15, partly restored. Font with
octagonal bowl, panelled stem and moulded base set on older base
with spurs. Brass monument to Henry English, d.1393, and his
wife. Bell frame inscribed 'W. Hart Brinkley fecit 1825' and
lead plaque inscribed by church wardens, 1782.
Pevsner, Buildings of England, p.505.
RCHM (Cambs notes), 1953.
CAS Proc. 1934. Burrell and Benton 'Alabaster Carvings'.


Listing NGR: TL6596859155

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

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