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Hale Farmhouse

A Grade II Listed Building in Winscombe, North Somerset

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.3038 / 51°18'13"N

Longitude: -2.8262 / 2°49'34"W

OS Eastings: 342497

OS Northings: 156398

OS Grid: ST424563

Mapcode National: GBR JD.Y5SS

Mapcode Global: VH7CT.YHRC

Entry Name: Hale Farmhouse

Listing Date: 2 June 1989

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1229669

English Heritage Legacy ID: 404467

Location: Winscombe and Sandford, North Somerset, BS25

County: North Somerset

Civil Parish: Winscombe and Sandford

Built-Up Area: Winscombe

Traditional County: Somerset

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Somerset

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Listing Text



ST 45 NW WINSCOMBE A.38
(South-east side)
3/28 Hale Farmhouse

II
Farmhouse, now house. C15 in origin, rebuilt in C17, extended C18 and C19.
Uncoursed rubble pointed with Bridgewater tile and Welsh slate roofs.
Probable longhouse in origin, altered in C17 into a 3 cell single depth cross
passage house with inserted floors and stack. North east wing added, probably
in the C18, (pre 1791) and the house was extended westward, circa 1800 (post
1791) with higher roof line. Two storey range throughout but the original
house was clearly single storey. Main (south) front of 5 bays the first being
the c1800 extension. This has a 16 pane sash over a French casement. The
second bay has 3 light casements, large on the ground floor. Bay three has a
2 light casement over an C18 6 panel door to cross passage. Bay 4 as bay 2.
Bay 5 has 8 pane sashes. Brick stacks at either end of bay one and backing
onto cross passage between bays 3 & 4. This is the inserted hall stack.
There is an additional bay once agricultural, set back at the west end on the
falling ground. 16 pane sash on either floor. North front has random 2 light
casements and a pointed arch window in the blocked cross passage entry. All
windows are modern joinery. Interior: The hall has an inserted beamed
ceiling resting on the internal jetty of the original solar. Two canted
arched doorway through to inner room. Probably early C16 hall fireplace with
plain chamfered timber lintel on plain chamfered stone jambs with half pyramidal
stops. Two canted arched door to wing, probably reset. Ancient plank doors
to loft and to under stair in corner. Cross passage with beamed ceiling on
large chamfered cross beams. Inner room with beamed ceiling showing changes
and bedrock in floor and wall, ancient wide floorboards above second large
fireplace in original west gable wall. Further features may be hidden behind
plaster etc. The roof has been entirely replaced with C19 king post trusses,
some thatch is retained beneath the tiles. Despite the alterations this
remains an interesting detail.
Ref. Reports by E H D Williams and F Neale 1988.


Listing NGR: ST4249756398

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Description



ST 45 NW WINSCOMBE A.38
(South-east side)
3/28 Hale Farmhouse

II
Farmhouse, now house. C15 in origin, rebuilt in C17, extended C18 and C19.
Uncoursed rubble pointed with Bridgewater tile and Welsh slate roofs.
Probable longhouse in origin, altered in C17 into a 3 cell single depth cross
passage house with inserted floors and stack. North east wing added, probably
in the C18, (pre 1791) and the house was extended westward, circa 1800 (post
1791) with higher roof line. Two storey range throughout but the original
house was clearly single storey. Main (south) front of 5 bays the first being
the c1800 extension. This has a 16 pane sash over a French casement. The
second bay has 3 light casements, large on the ground floor. Bay three has a
2 light casement over an C18 6 panel door to cross passage. Bay 4 as bay 2.
Bay 5 has 8 pane sashes. Brick stacks at either end of bay one and backing
onto cross passage between bays 3 & 4. This is the inserted hall stack.
There is an additional bay once agricultural, set back at the west end on the
falling ground. 16 pane sash on either floor. North front has random 2 light
casements and a pointed arch window in the blocked cross passage entry. All
windows are modern joinery. Interior: The hall has an inserted beamed
ceiling resting on the internal jetty of the original solar. Two canted
arched doorway through to inner room. Probably early C16 hall fireplace with
plain chamfered timber lintel on plain chamfered stone jambs with half pyramidal
stops. Two canted arched door to wing, probably reset. Ancient plank doors
to loft and to under stair in corner. Cross passage with beamed ceiling on
large chamfered cross beams. Inner room with beamed ceiling showing changes
and bedrock in floor and wall, ancient wide floorboards above second large
fireplace in original west gable wall. Further features may be hidden behind
plaster etc. The roof has been entirely replaced with C19 king post trusses,
some thatch is retained beneath the tiles. Despite the alterations this
remains an interesting detail.
Ref. Reports by E H D Williams and F Neale 1988.


Listing NGR: ST4249756398

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