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Palmers Lodge

A Grade II Listed Building in Whippingham, Isle of Wight

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Coordinates

Latitude: 50.7247 / 50°43'28"N

Longitude: -1.2549 / 1°15'17"W

OS Eastings: 452687

OS Northings: 91941

OS Grid: SZ526919

Mapcode National: GBR 9CJ.FJZ

Mapcode Global: FRA 8785.6Y4

Entry Name: Palmers Lodge

Listing Date: 22 March 2011

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1242947

English Heritage Legacy ID: 502406

Location: Whippingham, Isle of Wight, PO33

County: Isle of Wight

Civil Parish: Whippingham

Traditional County: Hampshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Isle of Wight

Church of England Parish: Whippingham St Mildred

Church of England Diocese: Portsmouth

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Listing Text


632/0/10033 LUSHINGTON HILL
22-MAR-11 Palmers Lodge

II
Entrance lodge. Built in 1864 in Osborne Gothic style (a development of the cottage orné style), probably by J R Mann, surveyor to the Osborne estate after 1857.

MATERIALS: polychrome brickwork with stone dressings and tiled roof with clustered brick and stone chimneystack with four embattled chimneypots and a smaller similar chimneystack.

PLAN: roughly rectangular in plan, of one storey and attics of three bays with irregular fenestration.

EXTERIOR: there are Royal coats of arms on the front and rear elevations. Each elevation has the lower part of the walls built of several courses of red brick divided by narrower courses of yellow brick and a wide band of yellow brick with a red brick diaper pattern above. Gables to front and back continue the bands of alternate red and yellow brickwork. The front elevation has a left side two-storey square bay with penticed roof, five-light window, elaborate wooden cross decoration and brackets between the floors and below. The ground floor window glazing incorporates a lozenge pattern. To the right is an off centre steeply-gabled weather porch continuing as stone buttresses with a dormer window above. It has elaborate wooden bargeboards and pointed arched half-glazed door behind. To the end right is a first floor gabled round-headed casement above a pointed arched ground floor casement. The left hand side has a central gable first floor window and one paired and one single pointed arched casement window below. The rear elevation has a projecting gable to the right hand side with penticed two-light casement on wooden brackets to the first floor and a two-light casement window below. To the left is a projecting smaller gable with pointed arched window over the rear entrance with a hipped roof. To the extreme left is a projecting ground floor gable with a pointed arched window.

INTERIOR: not inspected but a staircase with open balustrade is reported in sales particulars. The sitting room to the left of the hall has an open cast iron fireplace with pine surround. The room to the right of the hall has a fireplace with marble surround. There are exposed rafters in the kitchen. A stained glass window is reported on the first floor landing. Cast iron fireplaces are reported in two of the three bedrooms.

HISTORY: Palmers Lodge (prior to 1956 known as Ryde Road Lodge) was built in 1864 as the southernmost of the lodges on the Osborne estate. It was used as access to the Osborne estate for visitors arriving from Ryde by train. The railway line to Osborne House originally ran past the front elevation of the lodge and therefore the lodge was built side on to the road. Prince Albert was known to have taken an interest in designing buildings on the Osborne estate: Osborne House was designed by him in collaboration with Thomas Cubitt, he drew a preliminary sketch of Brickfield Cottages of 1853 and also a preliminary sketch for Whippingham School erected in 1863-4 by A J Humbert. Prince Albert died in 1861 but it is possible that he had some input into the design of this lodge which was probably built by J R Mann, a surveyor responsible for buildings on the Osborne estate after 1857. The building is shown on the 1885 Ordnance Survey map with a rectangular footprint.

The lodge was sold by the Crown Estates in 1956 and was called Palmers Lodge in the sale document. For a time it was in use as a care home.

SOURCES:
Lloyd, D, and Pevsner, N, Buildings of England. Isle of Wight, (2006) 298
Watson, Bull and Porter. (c 2006) Sales Particulars

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION:
Palmers Lodge, built in 1864 as the southernmost lodge on the Osborne estate is designated Grade II for the following principal reasons:
* Architectural interest: a bold and florid design in polychrome brickwork in Osborne Gothic style
* Historic interest: built as the southernmost lodge of Osborne House to provide access to the Osborne estate for visitors arriving by train
* Intactness: the exterior is little altered
* Group value: part of the Royal Osborne estate

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Description

632/0/10033

LUSHINGTON HILL
Palmers Lodge

22-MAR-11

II
Entrance lodge. Built in 1864 in Osborne Gothic style (a development of the cottage orné style), probably by J R Mann, surveyor to the Osborne estate after 1857.

MATERIALS: polychrome brickwork with stone dressings and tiled roof with clustered brick and stone chimneystack with four embattled chimneypots and a smaller similar chimneystack.

PLAN: roughly rectangular in plan, of one storey and attics of three bays with irregular fenestration.

EXTERIOR: there are Royal coats of arms on the front and rear elevations. Each elevation has the lower part of the walls built of several courses of red brick divided by narrower courses of yellow brick and a wide band of yellow brick with a red brick diaper pattern above. Gables to front and back continue the bands of alternate red and yellow brickwork. The front elevation has a left side two-storey square bay with penticed roof, five-light window, elaborate wooden cross decoration and brackets between the floors and below. The ground floor window glazing incorporates a lozenge pattern. To the right is an off centre steeply-gabled weather porch continuing as stone buttresses with a dormer window above. It has elaborate wooden bargeboards and pointed arched half-glazed door behind. To the end right is a first floor gabled round-headed casement above a pointed arched ground floor casement. The left hand side has a central gable first floor window and one paired and one single pointed arched casement window below. The rear elevation has a projecting gable to the right hand side with penticed two-light casement on wooden brackets to the first floor and a two-light casement window below. To the left is a projecting smaller gable with pointed arched window over the rear entrance with a hipped roof. To the extreme left is a projecting ground floor gable with a pointed arched window.

INTERIOR: not inspected but a staircase with open balustrade is reported in sales particulars. The sitting room to the left of the hall has an open cast iron fireplace with pine surround. The room to the right of the hall has a fireplace with marble surround. There are exposed rafters in the kitchen. A stained glass window is reported on the first floor landing. Cast iron fireplaces are reported in two of the three bedrooms.

HISTORY: Palmers Lodge (prior to 1956 known as Ryde Road Lodge) was built in 1864 as the southernmost of the lodges on the Osborne estate. It was used as access to the Osborne estate for visitors arriving from Ryde by train. The railway line to Osborne House originally ran past the front elevation of the lodge and therefore the lodge was built side on to the road. Prince Albert was known to have taken an interest in designing buildings on the Osborne estate: Osborne House was designed by him in collaboration with Thomas Cubitt, he drew a preliminary sketch of Brickfield Cottages of 1853 and also a preliminary sketch for Whippingham School erected in 1863-4 by A J Humbert. Prince Albert died in 1861 but it is possible that he had some input into the design of this lodge which was probably built by J R Mann, a surveyor responsible for buildings on the Osborne estate after 1857. The building is shown on the 1885 Ordnance Survey map with a rectangular footprint.

The lodge was sold by the Crown Estates in 1956 and was called Palmers Lodge in the sale document. For a time it was in use as a care home.

SOURCES:
Lloyd, D, and Pevsner, N, Buildings of England. Isle of Wight, (2006) 298
Watson, Bull and Porter. (c 2006) Sales Particulars

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION:
Palmers Lodge, built in 1864 as the southernmost lodge on the Osborne estate is designated Grade II for the following principal reasons:
* Architectural interest: a bold and florid design in polychrome brickwork in Osborne Gothic style
* Historic interest: built as the southernmost lodge of Osborne House to provide access to the Osborne estate for visitors arriving by train
* Intactness: the exterior is little altered
* Group value: part of the Royal Osborne estate

Reasons for Listing

Palmers Lodge, built in 1864 as the southernmost lodge on the Osborne estate probably by J R Mann, is designated Grade II for the following principal reasons:
* Architectural interest: a bold and florid design built of polychrome brickwork in Osborne Gothic style
* Historic interest: built as a lodge to provide access to the Osborne estate for visitors arriving by train. The Prince Consort may have had some input into the design although, as he died in 1861, it was probably built by J R Mann, surveyor responsible for buildings on the Osborne estate after 1857
* Degree of survival: the exterior is little altered
* Group value: part of the Royal Osborne estate. Osborne House is listed Grade I and the landscape is on the Register at Grade II*. Palmers Lodge is built in a similar style to Osborne Cottage of 1856-7, which is listed Grade II

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