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Bridge at Ngr Tl 3410 1355

A Grade II Listed Building in Hertford, Hertfordshire

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.8045 / 51°48'16"N

Longitude: -0.0565 / 0°3'23"W

OS Eastings: 534099

OS Northings: 213548

OS Grid: TL340135

Mapcode National: GBR KBK.Y99

Mapcode Global: VHGPG.ZX01

Entry Name: Bridge at Ngr Tl 3410 1355

Listing Date: 9 September 1996

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1268988

English Heritage Legacy ID: 461236

Location: Hertford, East Hertfordshire, Hertfordshire, SG13

County: Hertfordshire

District: East Hertfordshire

Civil Parish: Hertford

Built-Up Area: Hertford

Traditional County: Hertfordshire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Hertfordshire

Church of England Parish: Hertford All Saints

Church of England Diocese: St.Albans

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Listing Text


HERTFORD

TL3413NW THE NEW RIVER, THE KING'S MEAD
817-1/7/348 Bridge at NGR TL 3410 1355

II

Bridge, built to span the improved Hertford cut of the New
River. c1837. Formed of curved cast-iron arch girders, 10 set
close together with pierced spandrels, ornamental keystone,
convex chordal profile, approx 5m span, set between concave
curved abutments of yellow-brown stock brick, English bond.
Outer arches and abutments carry cast-iron and wrought-iron
post and rail handrails.
HISTORICAL NOTE: the New River was constructed in 1608-13 by
Sir Hugh Myddelton to provide water for London, with a 38 mile
water course from Chadwell Spring, between Ware and Hertford.
By early C18 the supply had become inadequate. In 1739 a new
Act allowed water to be drawn from the River Lea near
Hertford, to be measured by gauges, designed by Robert Mylne
(1733-1811). The River Lee Act of 1855 gave the New River
Company and the East London Waterworks Company the right to
take the whole of the Lea water, with the exception of that
required for navigation. An improved cut was made across the
King's Meads, and a new Gauge House (qv), designed by William
Chadwell Mylne (1761-1862) was built in 1856.
(Thames Water: History of the New River: London: 1985-; The
industrial archaeology of the British Isles: Branch Johnson W:
Industrial Archaeology of Hertfordshire: Newton Abbot: 1970-:
97-101 167).


Listing NGR: TL3409913548

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Description


HERTFORD

TL3413NW THE NEW RIVER, THE KING'S MEAD
817-1/7/348 Bridge at NGR TL 3410 1355

II

Bridge, built to span the improved Hertford cut of the New
River. c1837. Formed of curved cast-iron arch girders, 10 set
close together with pierced spandrels, ornamental keystone,
convex chordal profile, approx 5m span, set between concave
curved abutments of yellow-brown stock brick, English bond.
Outer arches and abutments carry cast-iron and wrought-iron
post and rail handrails.
HISTORICAL NOTE: the New River was constructed in 1608-13 by
Sir Hugh Myddelton to provide water for London, with a 38 mile
water course from Chadwell Spring, between Ware and Hertford.
By early C18 the supply had become inadequate. In 1739 a new
Act allowed water to be drawn from the River Lea near
Hertford, to be measured by gauges, designed by Robert Mylne
(1733-1811). The River Lee Act of 1855 gave the New River
Company and the East London Waterworks Company the right to
take the whole of the Lea water, with the exception of that
required for navigation. An improved cut was made across the
King's Meads, and a new Gauge House (qv), designed by William
Chadwell Mylne (1761-1862) was built in 1856.
(Thames Water: History of the New River: London: 1985-; The
industrial archaeology of the British Isles: Branch Johnson W:
Industrial Archaeology of Hertfordshire: Newton Abbot: 1970-:
97-101 167).


Listing NGR: TL3409913548

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