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Warehouse

A Grade II Listed Building in Central, Liverpool

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Coordinates

Latitude: 53.4089 / 53°24'32"N

Longitude: -2.9872 / 2°59'14"W

OS Eastings: 334470

OS Northings: 390688

OS Grid: SJ344906

Mapcode National: GBR 73M.TZ

Mapcode Global: WH877.2LS0

Entry Name: Warehouse

Listing Date: 3 July 2008

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1392636

English Heritage Legacy ID: 504167

Location: Liverpool, L2

County: Liverpool

Electoral Ward/Division: Central

Built-Up Area: Liverpool

Traditional County: Lancashire

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Merseyside

Church of England Parish: Liverpool Our Lady and St Nicholas

Church of England Diocese: Liverpool

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Listing Text


392/0/10303 CHEAPSIDE
03-JUL-08 11-13 (ODD)
Warehouse

II
Warehouse, c.1884, mellow red brick, polychrome brick facades to front and rear, English Garden Wall Bond, 4-storeys plus jigger loft and basement, shallow pitched roof concealed from view to all sides by a parapet, fireproof.

EXTERIOR: 3-bays. Windows diminish in size with every floor level (smallest at top). Cast-iron lintels, window and door frames, and glazing bars. Sandstone sills. Front elevation: Yellow brick with blue and red brick dressings, raised ground floor level in blue brick. Central loading bay set within full-height recess, tiered sheet-iron loading doors survive including that to basement, original pulley and hoist beam with semi-circular cast-iron head displaying relief numerals reading '1884'. Left bay with recessed arched entrance to ground floor with studded sheet-iron door, arched stair windows to floors above with 2-over-2 fixed-panes, segmental arched heads in red brick, slightly projecting sandstone keystones. Right bay with larger square windows (all with chamfered sides) lighting storage areas, 2-over-2 fixed-panes with top right lights being top-hung casements. Two short chimney stacks rising from roof to right side elevation. Rear elevation: Similar in style to front elevation. White brick with raised ground floor in blue brick, square-headed windows to outer bays (those to left bay are larger with 3-over-3 lights, doorway in same style as that to front to ground floor right.

INTERIOR: Enclosed stone stair to front left of building leading from basement to jigger loft, sheet-iron doors set within cast-iron frames lead off to right at every floor level into large open-plan warehouse spaces, internal windows set into rear of stair with sheet-iron shutters. Storage areas with heavy softwood timber floors supported by cast-iron columns. Basement with transverse brick-vaulted ceiling, cobblestone floor. Original internal sheet-iron shutters to some windows. Chimneybreast and plain fireplace to small room to ground floor front right. Jigger loft with original hoist machinery, timber king post roof trusses.

HISTORY: A number of Building Acts introduced in the early-mid C19 stipulated the use of structural features into warehouse design that would make warehouses less likely to collapse in the advent of fire, such as cast-iron columns on the ground floor, an enclosed stair bay, and timbers of a certain thickness. However, unlike in textile mills, fireproof construction in warehouses was not enforced and many continued to be built with either very limited or no provision throughout the C19. The warehouse at nos.11-13 Cheapside is believed to have been constructed in 1884. The street directories dating to 1890-1906 record the building as being occupied by provisions dealers and merchants, and wholesale grocers. Earlier buildings on the site are recorded as including one used by a veterinary surgeon and cowkeeper. In the 1920s the warehouse at nos.11-13 Cheapside was used as a warehouse for Richard Johnson, Clapham & Morris Ltd for their nearby metal manufacturing business situated in another warehouse at nos.23-27 Cheapside. The building at nos.11-13 Cheapside was later used as workshops, and during the late C20/early 21 was used for manufacturing kitchens. The top floor has also been used by a leather goods manufacturer.

SOURCES:
Giles C & Hawkins B. 2004. Storehouses of Empire: Liverpool's Historic Warehouses. London: English Heritage
Sharples J. 2004. Pevsner Architectural Guides: Liverpool. New Haven & London: Yale University Press

Unpublished sources: Liverpool Street Directories - C19 & C20. Liverpool City Archives

REASONS FOR DESIGNATION:
No.11-13 Cheapside is designated at grade II for the following principal reasons:

* It is an important survival of a late C19 fireproof warehouse associated with the international port city of Liverpool
* Its design is above the purely functional with finely detailed decorative treatment to the principal elevations including polychrome brickwork
* It survives unaltered both externally and internally
* Original features survive throughout including sheet-iron loading doors, internal doors and shutters, cast-iron lintels, frames and glazing bars, the enclosed fireproof stair and the jigger loft hoist machinery
* Its location in the heart of the commercial district off one of the principal routes within Liverpool and near to some of the city's most prestigious buildings reflects the high importance of warehousing and trade in the city during the late C19 and its integration into the physical fabric of the city
* It has group value with the nearby surviving warehouse at nos.23-27 Cheapside

This text is from the original listing, and may not necessarily reflect the current setting of the building.

Reasons for Listing

The warehouse at nos.11-13 Cheapside is designated at grade II for the following principal reasons:

* It is an important survival of a late C19 fireproof warehouse associated with the international port city of Liverpool
* Its design is above the purely functional with finely detailed decorative treatment to the principal elevations including polychrome brickwork
* It survives unaltered both externally and internally
* Original features survive throughout including sheet-iron loading doors, internal doors and shutters, cast-iron lintels, frames and glazing bars, the enclosed fireproof stair and the jigger loft hoist machinery
* Its location in the heart of the commercial district off one of the principal routes within Liverpool and near to some of the city's most prestigious buildings reflects the high importance of warehousing and trade in the city during the late C19 and its integration into the physical fabric of the city
* It has group value with the nearby surviving warehouse at nos.23-27 Cheapside

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