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Black Bull Hotel, 9 Market Place, Lauder

A Category B Listed Building in Lauder, Scottish Borders

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Coordinates

Latitude: 55.7198 / 55°43'11"N

Longitude: -2.7482 / 2°44'53"W

OS Eastings: 353095

OS Northings: 647626

OS Grid: NT530476

Mapcode National: GBR 9279.TG

Mapcode Global: WH7W3.RHJH

Plus Code: 9C7VP792+WP

Entry Name: Black Bull Hotel, 9 Market Place, Lauder

Listing Name: 9 Market Place, Black Bull Hotel

Listing Date: 9 June 1971

Category: B

Source: Historic Scotland

Source ID: 382226

Historic Scotland Designation Reference: LB37202

Building Class: Cultural

Location: Lauder

County: Scottish Borders

Town: Lauder

Electoral Ward: Leaderdale and Melrose

Traditional County: Berwickshire

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Description

Late 18th century, extended early 19th century with later additions. 2-storey and attic 7-bay former coaching inn with single and 2-storey rear (NE) wing and attached former stable block. Palladian window with Gothick astragals to principal (SW) elevation. Principal elevation rendered with incised lines in imitation of ashlar and painted ashlar dressings; harled elsewhere. Base course and eaves band to principal elevation; also architraved openings. Coped gables to either side of main block.

SW (PRINCIPAL) ELEVATION: 6 regularly-spaced bays to original building to right: entrances to 2nd and 5th bays; that to left has 2-leaf 6-panel timber door; that to right has 2-leaf 4-panel timber door and ashlar cornice. Flanking windows. Window to each bay to 1st floor. Gabled dormers to alternate bays above. Wide bay added to left in early 19th century to accommodate function rooms. Palladian window with Gothick astragals to arch head. Tripartite window with narrower flanking lights above.

NE ELEVATION: gable end of former stable block projects forward to centre. Late 20th century single storey addition set back to left. 2-storey gable end of mid-19th century rear wing set back; 2 1st floor windows; piended roofed section adjoins to right.

SE ELEVATION: blank gable end of original block/byre to left. Mid 19th century wing to right largely obscured by later lean-to section with entrance and window to right. Late 20th century single storey sections to right flanking large recessed entrance. Former stable block/byre (2 separate ranges) set back to right; entrance and 2 inserted windows to left section; entrance and loft window to right section.

NW ELEVATION: adjoins 7 Market Place.

12-pane/multipane timber sash and case windows to principal (S) elevation (several have original hand blown panes). Grey slate roofs. 3 harled coped ridge stacks including 2 gablehead stacks to main body of building; harled coped wallhead stack to rear; harled coped stack to piended-roofed rear wing.

INTERIOR: Adamesque plasterwork to ceiling of ground floor reception room; also panelled timber dado and round-arched niches. Otherwise most of ground floor altered and open-plan. Timber panelling with built in closets and bolection-moulded fireplace surround to 1st floor room to original section. Plaster cornicing to 1st floor room to early 19th century extension.

Statement of Interest

A substantial former coaching inn with a well preserved street frontage. It would appear to have been extended and upgraded in the early 19th century to include reception rooms. The main stabling appears to have been around a courtyard on the W side of the rear stable block/byre.

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