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Trefecca Fawr

A Grade I Listed Building in Talgarth, Powys

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.9771 / 51°58'37"N

Longitude: -3.2495 / 3°14'58"W

OS Eastings: 314274

OS Northings: 231691

OS Grid: SO142316

Mapcode National: GBR YW.KLLT

Mapcode Global: VH6BV.MKHR

Plus Code: 9C3RXQG2+R6

Entry Name: Trefecca Fawr

Listing Date: 28 February 1952

Last Amended: 14 August 1995

Grade: I

Source: Cadw

Source ID: 6653

Building Class: Domestic

Location: Located south of Trefeca hamlet, on a minor lane, approximately 100m from its junction with B.4560 Talgarth to Llangors road.

County: Powys

Community: Talgarth

Community: Talgarth

Traditional County: Brecknockshire

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Talgarth

History

Gentry house of c1650, built by Rebecca Prosser, with later additions. Owned by Thomas Harris of Tregunter, brother of Howel Harris, in late C18, and later by the Gwynne family.

Exterior

Rubble sandstone with hipped tiled roof. Two storeys. The form of the original house consists of a 2-bay hall and kitchen set E-W, to which is added c1675-1700 a 2-bay cross wing at the W end, perhaps replacing a parlour bay, providing the great and small parlours. Central main hall has an axial stack backing on to the kitchen, which has an extension to the N added after c1700 forming an approximately symmetrical N elevation. A C19 service building, separately roofed, is attached to the E side of this addition.

Central low nail-studded door with segmental head to hall, perhaps inserted post-1700 to replace a lobby entry. Above a mantled and crested arms of Gwynne family, with 20 quarterings. Either side, ovolo-moulded transomed 4-light windows, and 3 light symmetrical windows to upper floor. Parlour wing, built shortly after the main hall range has 2-light transomed windows, with thrice-rebated timber lintels, the soffits painted red. On the N front transomed stair window and a similar window to the great parlour. The added kitchen wing has 3 transomed windows on 2 floors. Two stacks to W side of parlour wing. E elevation, enclosed in small courtyard, has a 4-light ovolo moulded window to the kitchen, and a similar window to the S elevation, replaced with a C20 oak window.

Opposite the main N front is the Scheduled Ancient Monument No B87, probably the remains of landscaped formal gardens and canals, perhaps converted from earlier fishponds.

Interior

Main hall has a stone flagged floor and fully fielded moulded panelling divided by sharply tapered Ionic pilasters, the panelling eared over the bolection moulded chimneypiece, enriched with tongue-and-leaf moulding. Cornice partly survives. Plaster ceiling, comprising a central rosette within a wreath, within a square, set in a large roundel, containing sparse foliage sprays with detached fruits. Each angle of the room has similar foliage sprays enclosed in shaped panels formed by harvest wreaths.

Beyond a small room, the great parlour, also panelled, has an unusually fine coffered plaster ceiling of 1680-90, the ribs enriched with luxuriant harvest motifs, each of the compartments containing a garland enclosing similar curiously sparse foliage sprays. Wall panelling, the panels above the dado recessed to take stretched fabric. The small chamber adjoining now incorporating a former passage to a side door, has recessed oak shelving and a simple ceiling comprising a moulded central cross panel. A fireplace is contained in the NW angle of the room. Adjoining, in the N wing, is the dog-leg framed oak stair, also C17 and extending to attic level, comprising panelled square newels with ogee caps, and robustly turned balusters supporting a heavy moulded handrail.

Reasons for Listing

Included at Grade I for its exceptional importance in this region as a well-preserved gentry house, containing a remarkable range of C17 and later detail.

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