History in Structure

This site is entirely user-supported. See how you can help.

Balustrade with four lamp-standards in front of Richmond Terrace

A Grade II Listed Building in City of Westminster, London

More Photos »
Approximate Location Map
Large Map »

Coordinates

Latitude: 51.503 / 51°30'10"N

Longitude: -0.1252 / 0°7'30"W

OS Eastings: 530223

OS Northings: 179899

OS Grid: TQ302798

Mapcode National: GBR JH.1C

Mapcode Global: VHGQZ.SH54

Entry Name: Balustrade with four lamp-standards in front of Richmond Terrace

Listing Date: 5 February 1970

Last Amended: 21 December 2015

Grade: II

Source: Historic England

Source ID: 1265182

English Heritage Legacy ID: 425754

Location: Westminster, London, SW1A

County: London

District: City of Westminster

Electoral Ward/Division: St James's

Parish: Non Civil Parish

Built-Up Area: City of Westminster

Traditional County: Middlesex

Lieutenancy Area (Ceremonial County): Greater London

Church of England Parish: St Martin-in-the-Fields

Church of England Diocese: London

Find accommodation in
Holborn

Summary


Balustrade and retaining wall with four lamp standards, part of a development designed 1819 by Thomas Chawner and built 1822-4 by George and Henry Harrison.

Description

Balustrade and retaining wall with four lamp standards, part of a development designed 1819 by Thomas Chawner and built 1822-4 by George and Henry Harrison.

MATERIALS: granite balustrade and wall with cast-iron lamp standards.

DESCRIPTION: this structure forms the northern retaining wall to a ramped carriage drive running the full length of the terrace. It comprises a long granite balustrade, curved into scrolls at the extreme ends, and formed of groups of balusters alternating with square piers. The four central piers are surmounted by cast-iron lamp standards with Neoclassical ornament, ladder bars and finialed Nico lanterns.

History

Richmond Terrace was built in 1822-4 on the site of a house formerly belonging to the Duke of Richmond. The new terrace, comprising eight large town-houses of the first class, was developed by the Commission for Woods and Forests and designed by the latter's architect Thomas Chawner. The building work was carried out by the Westminster builder George Harrison, with design input from his architect brother Henry. The terrace faced north onto its own landscaped forecourt, screened from Whitehall by iron gates and a small entrance lodge (now demolished). The present balustrade formed the retaining wall to a ramped carriage drive which gave direct vehicular access to the front doors of the houses. Having been spared from complete demolition as envisaged in Leslie Martin's 1964-6 Whitehall masterplan, the front part of Richmond Terrace was eventually incorporated into a large new government building known as Richmond House, designed by Whitfield Associates and built in 1982-6.

Reasons for Listing

The balustrade and lamp standards in front of Richmond Terrace, part of a development designed 1819 by Thomas Chawner and built 1822-4 by George and Henry Harrison, are listed at Grade II for the following principal reasons:

* Architectural interest: the balustrade forms part of the architectural setting for Richmond Terrace, a particularly grand palace-fronted terrace of the late Georgian period;
* Planning interest: Richmond Terrace was a development of an unusual type, comprising a free-standing terrace facing its own landscaped forecourt, of which the balustrade and lamps were a key visual and functional element;
* Historic interest: part of an extremely prestigious development at the heart of London's government district, inhabited during the C19 and early C20 by various important figures in politics and finance;
* Rarity: a rare example of a group of lamp standards dating from the early C19;
* Group value: with the Terrace itself, as well as with the rich assemblage of nearby listed buildings on and around Whitehall, especially the former War Office opposite.

Selected Sources

Book cover links are generated automatically from the sources. They are not necessarily always correct, as book names at Amazon may not be quite the same as those used referenced in the text.

Source title links go to a search for the specified title at Amazon. Availability of the title is dependent on current publication status. You may also want to check AbeBooks, particularly for older titles.

Recommended Books

Other nearby listed buildings

BritishListedBuildings.co.uk is an independent online resource and is not associated with any government department. All government data published here is used under licence. Please do not contact BritishListedBuildings.co.uk for any queries related to any individual listed building, planning permission related to listed buildings or the listing process itself.

British Listed Buildings is a Good Stuff website.