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Ty Isaf

A Grade II Listed Building in Garw Valley (Cwm Garw), Bridgend

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Coordinates

Latitude: 51.5713 / 51°34'16"N

Longitude: -3.6064 / 3°36'23"W

OS Eastings: 288763

OS Northings: 187047

OS Grid: SS887870

Mapcode National: GBR HC.D7KR

Mapcode Global: VH5H4.FRST

Entry Name: Ty Isaf

Listing Date: 30 July 1997

Last Amended: 30 July 1997

Grade: II

Source: Cadw

Source ID: 18637

Building Class: Domestic

Location: Situated near the SW boundary of the community on the hillside above the Llynfi Valley near the hamlet of Shwt, down a farm track off the rural lane linking the early farmsteads of this area.

County: Bridgend

Community: Garw Valley (Cwm Garw)

Community: Garw Valley

Locality: Bettws

Traditional County: Glamorgan

Find accommodation in
Bettws

History

Apparently of two main building periods: the E core unit C16, and W wing, porch, separate kitchen block NW and rear service wing NE of C17.

Exterior

The main house is 2 storyed with a 2 storeyed cross gabled S porch, and has two rear cross wings, that to E only a little lower than the main ridge and battered at base, and the former kitchen wing to W a single storey and attic; attached to W is a former farm range now ruined. Built of sandstone rubble with some boulder footings, lime rendered and limewashed, now white but buff tinted beneath. Welsh slate roofs with rendered stacks centre ridge, end ridge W, to kitchen wing, and a corbelled first floor chimney to rear E wing. Two storeyed porch dominating S frontage has Tudor arched chamfered central stone doorway now partially blocked creating a window, with first floor remodelled window in apex and small window side right. To right a small upper window under eaves is a 3/3 pane sash with segmental arched 6/6 pane casement below to ground floor; to left a 6/6 pane casement window to first floor, replacement window below. Side range right has small casement windows. To rear under corbelled chimney is a decayed stone square headed 2 light mullioned window; other windows without historic features, likewise the 2 rear entrances through rear wings though former side entrance to NE wing has voussoirs.

Interior

Earlier unit E consists of a small room left (W) and hall right (E), the former entrance opening onto the dividing chimney. The small room has an axial beam with slots for a timber screen, broad chamfered beams with filleted stops and square joists reed moulded on the lower face to S; N window with seat in reveals. The hall has deeply chamfered cross beams with broach stops partly supported by corbels and similar joists and has a window seat in reveals; on the adjacent wall were formerly wallpaintings of figures in Elizabethan dress; large open fireplace with doorways on each side. Winding stone stairs to right have curved treads and a limewashed cross slab roof. Upper floor has exposed massive A-frame roof truss in main room with tie beam cut, 3 rows of trenched purlins and the timbers which accommodate the addition of the rear wing; blocked fireplace and no visible chimney now in end wall. Small upper room gives access to upper porch room. Later wing NE has wide timber floorboards and fireplace. Later wing SE has on ground floor second large open fireplace with repaired timber lintel; chamfered beams with broach stops; blocked openings; second winding stone staircase to right. Kitchen wing on two levels and now joined to main range at NW also has a chimney with bread oven and winding stone staircase adjacent and cross beams with broad chamfers and filleted stops. All interior plaster removed c 1970s and replaced with cement render; this now removed and the building being repaired (1996).

Reasons for Listing

Listed notwithstanding some unsympathetic C20 features for the mainly complete survival of the historic fabric of building periods in C16 and C17.

Recommended Books

Other nearby listed buildings

  • II Tyle-coch
    Approximately 1.5 km NW of Bettws and 2 km SE of Llangynwyd, down a short farm track off an old country lane linking a number of early farmsteads.
  • II Pont-y-rhyd-ddu (partly in Garw Valley community)
    The bridge carries the road to Shwt, Bettws and Llangeinor across the Afon Llyvni, near the road junction with the A4063.
  • II Small Tramroad bridge over Nant Cedfyw, Shwt
    Situated at the confluence of the two streams in Cwm Cedfyw. Reached via a long track following the line of the old tramway, N of the farmstead of Shwt Uchaf and in the cwm E of Tyle-coch.
  • II Cefn-ydfa farmhouse and adjoining ruins.
    The house stands on a platform site, on the NE slope of Mynnydd Baiden, and is reached by a long driveway from the A4063 between the Shwt turn and the Bridgend Paper Mills.
  • II Walls flanking the inclined plane joining the Bettws tramway to the DLP Railway.
    The inclined plane rises from near road level at a steep angle to join the former Duffryn Llynvi and Porthcawl Railway on the W side of the valley, half-way between Nicholls Road and the Shwt turning
  • I Church of St David, Bettws
    Situated on the hilltop at the centre of the village which became the core of a post-war estate development.
  • II Nicholls Arms PH
    The building stands on a steeply sloping corner site, facing the minor Nicholls Road running W off the main A4063 Maesteg to Bridgend Road.
  • II Gelli-siriol farmhouse
    The large farmhouse is set on a platform site above the Afon Llynfi valley, and is reached by a long farm track leading E off the A4063 Bridgend Road approximately 750m S of Pont-rhyd-y-cyff crossroad

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